A Treatise on the Resistance of Materials, and an Appendix on the Preservation of Timber (Google eBook)

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J. Wiley & Son, 1871 - Strength of materials - 245 pages
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Contents

Graphical Representation
12
Coefficient of Elasticity of Malleable Iron
14
Elasticity of Wood Longitudinally
15
Elasticity of Wood Radially
16
Remark on the Coefficient of Elasticity
17
sidered
19
Work of Elongation
20
Vertical Oscillations
21
Viscocity of Solids
22
Modulus of Strength
23
Strength of a Prismatic Bar
24
Strength of a Prismatic Bar when its weight is considered
25
Strength of a Closed Cylinder
26
Strength of Glass Globes
30
Experiments on Riveted Plates
31
Strength of Rolled Sheets of Iron in different directions
33
Strength of Wrought Iron at various temperatures
36
NO of
39
Effect of Severe Strains on the Tenacity of Iron
40
Effect of Repeated Rupture
41
Strength of Metals Modified by Treatment
42
Effect of Prolonged Fusion on Cast Iron
43
Cooling Cast IronAffects Strength of
44
CHAPTER II
46
Compression of Cast Iron
47
Compression of Wrought Iron
48
Graphical Representation of Results
50
Modulus of Strain
51
Resistance of Cast Iron to Crushing v
53
Resistance of Cast Steel to Crushing
54
Strength of Pillars
55
Formulas for the Weight of Pillars
58
Irregularities in the Thickness of Cast Pillars
60
Buckling of Tubes 06
66
Results of Experiments on Collapsing
72
Strength of very long Tubes
73
CHAPTER III
75
Robert Hookes Theory
76
Parents Theory
77
Naviers Developments of Theory
78
Barlows Theory
79
Remarks upon the Theories
82
Position of the Neutral Axis found Experimentally
83
Position of the Neutral Axis found Analytically
84
SHEARING STRESS
87
Examples of Shearing Stress
89
A Problem of a Tie Beam
91
A Problem of Riveted Plates
92
Shearing Resistance to Torsion
95
CHAPTER V
96
General Equation of the Elastic Curve
98
General Statement op the Problems
99
Beams Fixed at one end and Loaded Uniformly
101
Previous Cases Combined
102
Beams Supported at their Ends and Loaded Uniformly
105
Examples
106
Beams subjected to Oblique Strains
124
Flexure of Columns
126
Definition of Graphical Methods
129
Solution of Case I by the Graphical Method
131
Solution of Case II by the Graphical Method
133
Solution of Case III by the Graphical Method
134
Remark in regard to other Cases
135
Moment of Inertia of a Rectangle by the Graphical Method
136
Moment of Inertia of a Circle by the Graphical Method
137
Remark in regard to the Moment of Inertia of other Surfaces
139
CHAPTER VI
140
Definition of the Modulus of Rupture
142
Practical Formulas
144
Relative Strength of a Beam
145
Relation between Strain and Deflection
146
Strength of Hollow Rectangular Beams
147
Strength of Double T Beams
148
True Value of d
150
Experiments of Baron Von Beber for determining the Thickness of the Vertical Web
151
Another Graphical Method
154
Treatment of Irregular Sections
156
Formula of Strength according to Barlows Theory
158
Strength of a Beam Loaded at any number of Points
159
Strength of a Beam when Loaded Uniformly over a portion of its length
160
Example of Oblique Strain
162
General Formula of Strength
163
Strength of a Rectangular Beam determined from the General For mula
164
Strongest Rectangular Beam which can be cut from a given Cylin drical one
166
Strongest Trapezoidal Beam which can be cut from a Triangular one
168
Moment of Resistance of Cylindrical Beams
169
Moment of Resistance of Elliptical Beams
171
Strength according to Barlows Theory
172
Beams Fixed at one end and Uniformly Loaded
174
The two preceding Cases Combined
175
Beams Fixed at one end and the weight of the Beam the only Load
176
Beams Supported at their Ends
178
Beams Fixed at their Ends
179
Effect of Transverse Shearing Stress on Modifying the form of the Beams of Uniform Resistance and Tabulated Values of Shearing Stresses
180
Unsolved Problems of Beams of Uniform Resistance
183
Best form of CastIron Beam as found Experimentally
184
Hodgkinsons Formula for the Strength of Beams of the Type Form
187
Remark on Rolled Wrought Iron Beams
188
CHAPTER VIII
189
Value of the Coefficient of Elastic Resistance to Torsion
191
Torsion Pendulum
192
Rupture by Torsion
193
Practical Formulas
194
Results of Wertheims Experiments
196
CHAPTER IX
198
Hodgkinsons Experiments
199
Roeblings Observations
202
Effect of Shocks 20fi
209
Crystallization 310
210
Risk and Safety
219
APPENDIX L
231
APPENDIX II
241

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 113 - The portions be and e ( resemble simple beams and their upper edges are in compression while the lower are in tension. If the ends of the girders are not fixed, but are simply supported, the curves will be as shown in Fig. 34. The curves of each span produced by a uniform load resemble those of a beam fixed at one end and supported at the other. The location of the points of contraflexure and the value of the bending moments are affected by the distribution of the load and the section of the girder....
Page 208 - From these experiments on tension at widely different temperatures we have thus found : 1. That the absolute strength of iron and steel is not diminished by cold, but that even at the lowest temperature which ever occurs in Sweden, it is at least as great as at the ordinary temperature (about 60 Fahr.).
Page 2 - Stresses are the forces which are applied to bodies to bring into action their elastic and cohesive properties. These forces cause alterations of the forms of the bodies upon which they act. Strain is a name given to the kind of alteration produced by the stresses. The distinction between stress and strain is not always observed, one being used for the other. (Wood.) Stresses are of different kinds, viz.
Page 33 - The result shewed that the length-strip was 7jV per cent, stronger than the one cut crosswise, considering the tenacity of the latter equal to 100. Of the other sets, embracing about 40 strips cut in each direction, it appears that some kinds of boiler iron manifest much greater inequality in the two directions than others. It is in certain cases not much over one per cent., and in others exceeds twenty, and as a mean of the whole series it may be stated to amount to six per cent, of the strength...
Page 238 - ... It was naturally supposed that poisoning the timber would poison or drive away the teredo, but Kyan's, and all other processes employing solutions of the salts of metals of alkaline earths, signally failed. This, however, is not surprising. The constant motion of sea-water soon dilutes and washes away the small quantity of soluble poison with which the wood has been injected. If any albuminate of a metallic base still remains in the wood, the poisonous properties of the injection have been destroyed...
Page 140 - The modulus of rupture for transverse stress is the stre'ss at the instant of rupture upon a unit of the section which is most remote from the neutral axis on the side which first ruptures.
Page 34 - ... differing by only 60 Ibs. to the square inch. This seems to prove that by both methods of preparing the specimens the accidental weakening effect of slitting had been removed by separating all that portion of the metal on which it had been exerted. Hence we may infer that the differences...
Page 212 - ... invariably break after a certain length of service. They have a " life " which is limited. Several years ago Fairbairn wrote : ' ' We know that In some cases wrought iron subjected to continuous vibration assumes a crystalline structure, and that the cohesive powers are much deteriorated, but we are ignorant of the causes of this change." We are still ignorant, not only of the causes of this change, but of the conditions under which it takes place.
Page 209 - ... employed for rails in the three principal rail-making countries (Wales, France, and Belgium), the breaking strain, as tested by sudden blows or shocks, is considerably influenced by cold; such iron exhibiting at 10 Fahr. only from one-third to one-fourth of the strength which it possesses at 84 Fahr.
Page 223 - In regard to the margin that should be left for safety, much depends upon the character of the loading. If the load is simply a dead weight, the margin may be comparatively small; but if the structure is to be subjected to percussive forces or shocks, it is evident that the margin should be comparatively large, on account of the indeterminate effect, produced by the force.

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