History of the United States of America: From the Discovery of the Continent [to 1789], Volume 6 (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton and company, 1885 - United States
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Contents

Liberal opinion of Burke
43
Ministry of Fox and the duke of Portland The king against the ministry 44 Fox and the navigation act
45
Long debates upon it 382
47
The king sure that America could establish no stable government
51
Holland Spain
57
Debate on revenue
63
Mercer and Arthur Lee combat Madison
69
Washingtons meditations His appeal to the governor of Virginia 70 Conduct of Gates His plan of action Armstrongs anonymous address 71 Washing...
72
CHAPTER VII
78
The opportunity of the citizens of America
84
How Washingtons legacy was received in Connecticut
90
In New York In Massachusetts
93
Hamilton on the defects of the confederation
99
Madison forced to retire by the rule of rotation
105
Congress declines to lead the way England compels union
112
Jeffersons lifelong opinion on slavery
118
National measures of Virginia
122
Washington negotiates between Virginia and Maryland He refuses gifts
128
Grayson favors the prohibition of slavery
134
Boston demands more powers for congress and a protective tariff 189
140
The objections of Richard Henry Lee
144
England will not treat except on the condition of a preference 148 Adams proposes retaliation Interview of Adams with Pitt 149 The United States ag...
152
Of a university No state to trespass on the rights of another state 861
153
Of the Baptists Of the convention of the Presbyterian church
158
Rapid increase of the Methodists Roman Catholies in the United States
164
The court and the legislature of Rhode Island in conflict
169
Inflexibility of Washington
175
His religion His hatred of war
181
Plan for a federal convention
187
New York retains the collecting of the revenue
193
TIRGINIA INVITES DEPUTIES OF THE SEVEbAL LEGISLATURES OF THE STATES
195
The decision of New York The insurrection in Massachusetts 200 Its legislature accepts the invitation from Annapolis 201 So do South Carolina and ...
202
THE CONSTITUTION
207
Arrival of Washington Opening of the federal convention
208
Limited power of the delegates from Delaware
211
The distribution of representation 362
215
Extent of the federal legislative powers
217
The judiciary
223
The requirement of an oath
229
Speech and plan of Hamilton
235
How his plan was received
237
History of the clause against slavery
289
Qualifications of membership Discrimination against the foreignborn 295 Property qualification rejected
296
Power to emit paper money discussed by Hamilton 801
302
The power absolutely prohibited 805
308
Navy and militia Clause on the militia 813
314
The questions of the slavetrade and of a navigation act committed
320
In South Carolina 92
322
CHAPTER IX
326
The decision not accepted as final Report of the committee of detail
332
Of Hamilton How the votes were to be counted
338
Restraints proposed on the executive power A privy council proposed 843
344
Judges not removable by address Extent of the judicial power
350
How the constitution was to be ratified 855
356
Slavery not recognized as a legal condition
362
TUE PEOPLE OF THE STATES TX JUDQMEXT OX THE COX8TITU
371
Washington wins over Randolph 877
377
Reception of the resolution of congress A convention called 883
384
Pennsylvania ratifies the constitution
390
Condition of the state The elections
396
The slavetrade Hancock proposes resolutions
402
The constitution in New Hampshire
409
The constitution in South Carolina Attitude of its assembly 414 Debate between Lowndes and Pinckney
415
The convention organized 211
419
CHAPTER V
421
The opposition in the Virginia convention Madison 425 And Pendleton Mason Patrick Henry leads the opposition 426 Is replied to by Pendleton and...
427
Noble speech of Randolph Slavery condemned by Johnson 432 Navigation of the Mississippi
433
_ PAGI
441
How the constitution is to be amended
447
Hamilton and a revenue tariff
453
Debate between Smith and Hamilton Lansing holds out
459
Opinions of Jefferson 403
461
In Virginia In South Carolina
467
Of John Adams 408
471
And of America
478
Pennsylvania 881
487
Final draft of the constitution
498
Convention of North Carolina 460
500
The constitution the institution of a government by the people
507
Of New Hampshire Rhode Island 169
543
Copyright

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Page 472 - Heaven itself has ordained; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered as .deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment intrusted to the hands of the American people.
Page 218 - Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate States are incompetent, or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation ; to negative all laws passed by the several States contravening, in the opinion of the National Legislature, the Articles of Union, or any treaty subsisting under the authority of the Union...
Page 148 - I have done nothing in the late Contest, but what I thought myself indispensably bound to do, by the Duty which I owed to my People. I will be very frank with you. I was the last to consent to the Separation, but the Separation having been made and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the Friendship of the United States as an independent Power.
Page 106 - With a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 390 - Under the Articles of Confederation each State retained its sovereignty, freedom and independence, and every power, jurisdiction and right not expressly delegated to the United States.
Page 321 - I congratulate you, fellow-citizens, on the approach of the period at which you may interpose your authority constitutionally, to withdraw the citizens of the United States from all further participation in those violations of human rights which have been so long continued on the unoffending inhabitants of Africa, and which the morality, the reputation, and the best interests of our country, have long been eager to proscribe.
Page 374 - That the said report, with the resolutions and letter accompanying the same, be transmitted to the several legislatures, in order to be submitted to a convention of delegates, chosen in each State by the people thereof, in conformity to the resolves of the convention made and provided in that case.
Page 158 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief...
Page 45 - The time shall come, when, free as seas or wind, Unbounded Thames shall flow for all mankind, Whole nations enter with each swelling tide, And seas but join the regions they divide; Earth's distant ends our glory shall behold, And the new world launch forth to seek the old.
Page 365 - On the whole, sir, I cannot help expressing a wish that every member of the Convention, who may still have objections to it, would with me, on this occasion, doubt a little of his own infallibility and, to make manifest our unanimity, put his name to this instrument.

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