A Literary History of Scotland (Google eBook)

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Scribner's Sons, 1903 - Scottish literature - 703 pages
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Page 447 - Proud Maisie is in the wood, Walking so early; Sweet Robin sits on the bush, Singing so rarely. '"Tell me, thou bonny bird. When shall I marry me?' 'When six braw gentlemen Kirkward shall carry ye.' '"Who makes the bridal bed, Birdie, say truly?' 'The grey-headed sexton, That delves the grave duly. "The glow-worm o'er grave and stone Shall light thee steady; The owl from the steeple sing, 'Welcome, proud lady.
Page 345 - The property which every man has in his own labour, as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable.
Page 195 - O that I were where Helen lies ! Night and day on me she cries ; Out of my bed she bids me rise, Says ' Haste and come to me !' 0 Helen fair ! O Helen chaste ! If I were with thee, I were blest.
Page 345 - People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.
Page 194 - I wish I were where Helen lies ! Night and day on me she cries ; And I am weary of the skies, For her sake that died for me.
Page 194 - Curst be the heart that thought the thought, And curst the hand that fired the shot, When in my arms Burd Helen dropt, And died to succour me ! 0 think na ye my heart was sair, When my love dropt down and spak' nae mair ! There did she swoon wi' meikle care, On fair Kirconnell lea.
Page 415 - Yestreen, when to the trembling string The dance gaed thro' the lighted ha', To thee my fancy took its wing, I sat, but neither heard or saw : Tho' this was fair, and that was braw, And yon the toast of a' the town, I sigh'd, and said amang them a',
Page 445 - I'd rather rove with Edmund there, Than reign our English queen." " If, Maiden, thou would'st wend with me, To leave both tower and town, Thou first must guess what life lead we, That dwell by dale and down ? And if thou canst that...
Page 469 - Ride your ways,' said the gipsy, 'ride your ways, Laird of Ellangowan ride your ways, Godfrey Bertram! This day have ye quenched seven smoking hearths see if the fire in your ain parlour burn the blither for that. Ye have riven the thack off seven cottar houses look if your ain roof-tree stand the faster.
Page 351 - Deum, as a hymn of thanksgiving to God, and were joined by those of the other ships with tears of joy and transports of congratulation. This office of gratitude to Heaven was followed by an act of justice to their commander. They threw themselves at the feet of Columbus, with feelings of self-condemnation, mingled with reverence. They...

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