History of the discovery and settlement of the valley of the Mississippi, by the three great European powers, Spain, France, and Great Britain: and the subsequent occupation, settlement and extension of civil government by the United States until the year 1846, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Harper & Bros., 1846 - History - 1162 pages
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Page 384 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the Whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, ' Logan is the friend of white men.
Page 144 - I, in virtue of the commission of his Majesty which I hold in my hand, and which may be seen by all whom it may concern, have taken, and do now take, in the name of his Majesty and of his...
Page 325 - Indians within those parts of our colonies where we have thought proper to allow settlement; but that if at any time any of the said Indians should be inclined to dispose of the said lands, the same shall be purchased only for us, in our name, at some public meeting or assembly of the said Indians, to be held for that purpose by the governor or commander in chief of our colony respectively within which they shall lie...
Page 144 - River Colbert; hereby protesting against all those, who may in future undertake to invade any or all of these countries, people, or lands, above described, to the prejudice of the right of his Majesty, acquired by the consent of the nations herein named. Of which, and of all that can be needed, I hereby take to witness those who hear me, and demand an act of the Notary, as required by law.
Page 429 - For if I am obliged to storm, you may depend on such treatment as is justly due to a murderer. Beware of destroying stores of any kind, or any papers or letters that are in your possession, or hurting one house in town for, by heavens! if you do, there shall be no mercy shown you.
Page 384 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance : for my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life. Who is there to mourn for Logan ? Not one...
Page 325 - We do, with the Advice of our Privy Council, strictly enjoin and require, that no private Person do presume to make any Purchase from the said Indians of any Lands reserved to the said Indians, within those parts of our Colonies where We have thought proper to allow Settlement...
Page 163 - Atlantic coast, by a cordon of military posts from the lakes of Canada on the north, to the Gulf of Mexico on the south, as first suggested by La Salle himself, on his visit to Paris in the year 1684.
Page 432 - They have seen that the conduct of the British officers, civil and military, has, in the whole course of this war, been savage, and unprecedented among civilized nations...
Page 415 - George Rogers Clark: You are to proceed, with all convenient speed, to raise seven companies of soldiers to consist of fifty men each, officered in the usual manner, and armed most properly for the enterprize; and with this force attack the British post at Kaskasky.

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