The First Voyage Round the World, by Magellan, Issue 52 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Henry Edward John Stanley Baron Stanley
Hakluyt Society, 1874 - Voyages around the world - 257 pages
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Contents

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II
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III
35
IV
164
V
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VI
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VII
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VIII
211
IX
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243

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Page i - Nil desperandum Teucro duce et auspice Teucro ; Certus enim promisit Apollo Ambiguam tellure nova Salamina futuram. O fortes pejoraque passi Mecum saepe viri, nunc vino pellite curas ; Cras ingens iterabimus aequor.
Page 64 - November, 1520, we came forth out of the said strait, and entered into the Pacific sea, where we remained three months and twenty days without taking in provisions or other refreshments, and we only ate old biscuit reduced to powder, and full of grubs, and stinking from the dirt which the rats had made on it when eating the good biscuit, and we drank water that was yellow and stinking.
Page 50 - ... sand and dust on his head. Our captain sent one of his men towards him, whom he charged to sing and leap like the other to reassure him, and show him friendship. This he did, and immediately the sailor led this giant to a little island where the captain was waiting for him; and when he was before us he began to be astonished, and to be afraid, and he raised one finger on high, thinking that we came from heaven.
Page 75 - ... armlets on their arms and kerchiefs about their heads. We stayed there one week, and during that time our captain went ashore daily to visit the sick, and every morning gave them cocoanut water from his own hand, which comforted them greatly. There are people living near that island who have holes in their ears so large that they can pass their arms through them. Those people are caphri, that is to say, heathen. They go naked, with a cloth woven from the bark of a tree about their privies, except...
Page 245 - Emperor on account of the demarcation line," and that he could prove it. They replied that they knew he was speaking the truth but it could not be helped because the Emperor "could not navigate through the sea within the demarcation of the King of Portugal.
Page 187 - Portuguese, because, as yet, nothing of the longitude had been clearly proved, yet it was quite plain that the Great Gulf and the people of Sinae lay within the Spanish boundary. This, too, was held to be most certain that the islands which they call the Moluccas, in which all spices are produced, and are thence exported to Malacca, lay within the Spanish western division, and that it was possible to sail there ; and that spices could be brought thence to Spain more easily, and at less expense and...
Page 187 - ... Catholic king. No appeal for patronage and support could be more effective, and how much reliance Magellan and his financial backer Christopher Haro placed upon it in their petition to King Charles appears clearly in the account by Maximilianus Transylvanus of Magellan's presentation of his project: "They both showed Caesar that though it was not yet quite sure whether Malacca was within the confines of the Spaniards or the Portuguese, because, as yet, nothing of the longitude had been clearly...
Page 104 - We asked him whether all the others and the interpreter were dead. He said that they were all dead except the interpreter. He begged us earnestly to redeem him with some of the merchandise; but Johan Carvaio, his boon companion, [ and others] would not allow the boat to go ashore so that they might remain masters of the ships.
Page xxix - Also, you may discover in any of those parts what has not yet been discovered, so that you do not discover nor do anything in the demarcation and limits of the most serene King of Portugal, my very dear and well-beloved uncle and brother, nor to his prejudice, but only within the limits of our demarcation.
Page 102 - I see revived in you the virtue of so great a captain, since one of his principal virtues was Constance in the most adverse fortune. In the midst of the sea he was able to endure hunger better than we. Most versed in nautical charts, he knew better than any other the true art of navigation, of which it is a certain proof that he knew by his genius, and his intrepidity, without anyone having given him the example, how to attempt the circuit of the globe, which he had almost completed.