The First Reader (Google eBook)

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American Book Company, 1902 - Readers - 100 pages
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Contents

Morning Sounds James Beattie
34
The Hermit James Beattie
36
The Survivors of the Battle of Bunker Hill Daniel Webster
38
Ode How sleep the Brave William Collins
41
The Death of Le Fevre Laurence Sterne
42
How to render Matteroffact and Earnest Ideas Mark Bailey
44
The Battle of Hastings Charles Dickens
48
An Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog Oliver Goldsmith
54
The Nightingale S H Peabody
56
Dotheboys Hall Charles Dickens
58
An April Day Caroline A B Southey
62
Gods Dominion and Mans Dependence
64
and XC
66
How to render Noble Ideas Mark Bailey
68
Earthquakes and Volcanoes Edward Hitchcock
71
Sunday George Herbert
75
The Rescue of a Kitten Henry Fielding
76
Sunset on the Border Sir Walter Scott
78
The Coyote S L Clemens Mark Twain
80
For a that and a that Robert Burns
82
How to render Joyous Ideas Mark Bailey
84
Mignons Song Goethe Thomas Carlyles translation
87
The Thirteen Colonies T W Higginson
90
The Vanity of Human Pride William Knox
92
Frozen Words Joseph Addison
95
What constitutes a State? Sir William Jones
98
The Effect of Pauls Preaching at Ephesus
100
2341
102
The Coronach Sir Walter Scott
103
How to render Sad Ideas Mark Bailey
105
The Paupers Deathbed Caroline A B Southey
107
Mrs Caudle urging the Need of Spring Clothing Douglas W Jerrold
109
Under the Greenwood Tree William Shakespeare
113
Mexico as first seen by the Spaniards William H Prescott
114
Thanatopsis William Cullen Bryant
119
Emmets Vindication Robert Emmet
120
Adieu to my Native Land Lord Byron
124
The Battle of the Ants Henry D Thoreau
127
The Soldiers Dream Thomas Campbell
131
Dr Primrose in Prison Oliver Goldsmith
133
Dialogue with the Gout Benjamin Franklin
136
Absalom N P Willis
139
The Blind Preacher William Wirt
144
America Bishop Berkeley
147
The Ascent to the Eagles Nest John Wilson
148
The Descent from the Eagles Nest John Wilson
153
The Hot Season Oliver Wendell Holmes
157
How to render Scornful and Sarcastic Ideas Mark Bailey
159
Hymn to the Night H W Longfellow
161
Speech of Brutus William Shakespeare
162
We watched her Breathing Tltomas Hood
164
In the Maine Woods Henry D Thoreau
165
Marco Bozzaris FitzQreene Halleck
169
Giant Despair John Bunyan
171
Escape from Doubting Castle John Bunyan
176
Mark Antonys Oration William Sltakespeare
179
LXT7 Sancho Panzas Government M de Cervantes
186
The Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaklava
190
Alfred Tennyson
192
The Charge of the Light Brigade W H Russell
193
Winter Percy Bysshe Shelley
195
Hidden Beauties of Classic Authors N P Willis
221
The Launch of the Ship H W Longfellow
222
Building the House Henry D Thoreau
224
Break break break Alfred Tennyson
227
Walden Pond Henry D Thoreau
228
Lochinvar Sir Waller Scott
232
How to render Impassioned Ideas Mark Bailey
234
How I learned to write Prose Benjamin Franklin
237
Translation of the Twenty third Psalm Joseph Addison
241
A Rill from the Town Pump Nathaniel Hawthorne
243
Wordsworth William The Kitten and the Falling Leaves IV 10
244
The Eve before Waterloo Lord Byron
249
The Battle of Waterloo Victor Hugo
252
The Defeat at Waterloo Victor Hugo
257
The Sublimity of God Psalm CIV
263
Poetic Reading I Mark Bailey
266
Mans Physical and Mental Superiority Daniel Webster
274
Each and All R W Emerson
275
Kip Van Winkles Sleep Washington Irving
278
Rip Van Winkles Return Washington Irving
283
Rip Van Winkles Recognition Washington Irving
287
Bannockburn Robert Burns
293
The Liberty of the Press John Milton
298
Poetic Reading II Mark Bailey 295
300
Poetic Reading Ill Mark Bailey
306
The Glory of God Psalm XIX
316
The Happy Valley Samuel Johnson
317
The Dream of Clarence William Shakespeare
320
The Time for Moral and Intellectual Culture Thomas De Quincey 824
324
UVlII My Oratorical Experience Nathaniel Hawthorne 832
335
Evening Oliver Wendell Holmes
347
Influence of the Translation of the Bible upon Litera ture William Hazlitt
354
Song of the Silent Land J G von Salts Longfellows translation
356
Beethovens Moonlight Sonata Anonymous
357
Darknessa Dream Lord Byron
362
OXX Gods Mightiness and Tenderness Psalms OIL and CIII
366
Washington Thomas Jefferson 867
369
The Necessity of Government John C Calhoun
370
The Way to Wealth Benjamin Franklin 871
379
The Last Man Thomas Campbell
386
Good Manners at the Table J W Phelps
387
New Years Eve Alfred Tennyson
392
The Greatness of Napoleon W E Channing
400
The Desert Anna C Bracket
402
Candles not used by the Ancients Thomas De Quincey
404
Rienzis Address to the Romans Mary R Mitford
407
Liberty or Death Patrick Henry
409
Fossil Poetry R C Trench
416
LAllegro John Milton
419
OldAge Theodore Parker
426
Penseroso John Milton
430
Garden Tlants A B Alcott
431
The Ancient Mariner 8 T Coleridge
434
CXLIH Carlyles Definition of Man Thomas Carlyle
444
Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington
447
Alfred Tennyson
450
Exequies of Mignon Goethe Thomas Carlyles translation
451
CXLVL The Closing Scene T B Read
456
Appendix Words Difficult to Spell
461
Copyright

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Page 83 - Guid faith he mauna fa' that ! For a' that, and a' that, Their dignities, and a' that, The pith o' sense, and pride o' worth, Are higher rank than a' that. Then let us pray that come it may, As come it will for a' that ; That sense and worth, o'er a' the earth, May bear the gree, and a' that. For a
Page 180 - Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And, sure, he is an honorable man. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause: What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?
Page 183 - This was the most unkindest cut of all ; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquished him : then burst his mighty heart ; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's statue, Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.
Page 412 - Gentlemen may cry peace! peace! but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!
Page 419 - And, if I give thee honour due, Mirth, admit me of thy crew, To live with her, and live with thee, In unreproved pleasures free. To hear the lark begin his flight, And singing startle the dull Night, From his watch-tower in the skies, Till the dappled Dawn doth rise...
Page 117 - The all-beholding sun shall see no more In all his course ; nor yet in the cold ground, Where thy pale form was laid with many tears, Nor in the embrace of ocean, shall exist Thy image. Earth, that nourished thee, shall claim Thy growth, to be resolved to earth again ; And, lost each human trace, surrendering up Thine individual being, shalt thou go To mix forever with the elements, To be a brother to the insensible rock, And to the sluggish clod, which the rude swain Turns with his share...
Page 232 - LOCHINVAR. LADY HERON'S SONG. 12. O, young Lochinvar is come out of the west, Through all the wide Border his steed was the best, And save his good broad-sword he weapons had none ; He rode all unarmed, and he rode all alone. So faithful in love, and so dauntless in war, There never was knight like the young Lochinvar.
Page 392 - Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky, The flying cloud, the frosty light; The year is dying in the night; Ring out, wild bells, and let him die. Ring out the old, ring in the new, Ring, happy bells, across the snow; The year is going, let him go; Ring out the false, ring in the true.
Page 428 - Oft, on a plat of rising ground, I hear the far-off curfew sound Over some wide-watered shore. Swinging slow with sullen roar; Or if the air will not permit, Some still removed place will fit, Where glowing embers through the room Teach light to counterfeit a gloom, Far from all resort of mirth, Save the cricket on the hearth, Or the bellman's drowsy charm To bless the doors from nightly harm.
Page 414 - Like a poet hidden In the light of thought, Singing hymns unbidden, Till the world is wrought To sympathy with hopes and fears it heeded not...

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