The tragedy of King Richard the Third (Google eBook)

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Clarendon Press, 1884
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Page 109 - My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain.
Page 237 - They have tied me to a stake ; I cannot fly, But, bear-like, I must fight the course. What's he, That was not born of woman ? Such a one Am I to fear, or none. Enter young SIWARD.
Page 205 - For mine own good, All causes shall give way : I am in blood Stepp'd in so far that, should I wade no more, Returning were as tedious as go o'er : Strange things I have in head, that will to hand ; Which must be acted ere they may be scann'd.
Page 138 - Thou art thy mother's glass, and she in thee Calls back the lovely April of her prime ; So thou through windows of thine age shalt see, Despite of wrinkles, this thy golden time.
Page 185 - ... wrist and held me hard ; Then goes he to the length of all his arm, And with his other hand thus o'er his brow, He falls to such perusal of my face As he would draw it.
Page 109 - Give me another horse: bind up my wounds. Have mercy, Jesu! Soft! I did but dream. 0 coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me! The lights burn blue. It is now dead midnight. Cold fearful drops stand on my trembling flesh.
Page 27 - A thousand men, that fishes gnaw'd upon ; Wedges of gold, great anchors, heaps of pearl, Inestimable stones, unvalued jewels, All scattered in the bottom of the sea...
Page 212 - Would have mourn'd longer, married with my uncle, My father's brother, but no more like my father Than I to Hercules: within a month, Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears Had left the flushing in her galled eyes, She married.
Page 4 - Our bruised arms hung up for monuments, Our stern alarums chang'd to merry meetings, Our dreadful marches to delightful measures. Grim-visag'd war hath smooth'd his wrinkled front; And now, instead of mounting barbed steeds To fright the souls of fearful adversaries, He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber, To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.
Page 138 - Them take, and purify thyself with them, and be at charges with them, that they may shave their heads : and all may know that those things whereof they were informed concerning thee, are nothing ; but that thou thyself also walkest orderly, and keepest the law.

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