Celtic Mythology, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Marshall Jones Company, 1918 - Celts - 308 pages
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Contents

II
xvii
III
23
IV
42
V
49
VI
54
VII
62
VIII
68
IX
78
XXVI
261
XXVII
267
XXVIII
270
XXIX
273
XXX
275
XXXI
279
XXXII
284
XXXIII
286

X
92
XI
114
XII
124
XIII
135
XIV
139
XV
160
XVI
184
XVII
206
XVIII
215
XIX
225
XX
227
XXI
233
XXII
240
XXIII
249
XXIV
253
XXV
256
XXXIV
292
XXXV
297
XXXVI
299
XXXVII
301
XXXVIII
ii
XXXIX
iii
XL
iv
XLI
v
XLII
295
XLIII
305
XLIV
307
XLV
311
XLVI
313
XLVII
315
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Page 213 - The lonely mountains o'er And the resounding shore A voice of weeping heard, and loud lament; From haunted spring and dale Edged with poplar pale The parting Genius is with sighing sent; With flower-inwoven tresses torn The Nymphs in twilight shade of tangled thickets mourn.
Page 381 - OSSIAN. The Poems of Ossian in the Original Gaelic. With a Literal Translation into English, and a Dissertation on the Authenticity of the Poems.
Page xv - OF THE AUTHOR AUTHOR'S PREFACE TN a former work * I have considered at some length the reA ligion of the ancient Celts; the present study describes those Celtic myths which remain to us as a precious legacy from the past, and is supplementary to the earlier book. These myths, as I show, seldom exist as the pagan Celts knew them, for they have been altered in various ways, since romance, pseudo-history, and the influences of Christianity have all affected many of them. Still they are full of interest,...
Page 138 - The mythic trees of Elysium were not unknown on earth, though there they were safely guarded; and another instance, besides those already described,17 is found in the oak of Mugna. "Berries to berries the Strong Upholder [a god?] put upon it. Three fruits upon it, viz. acorn, apple, and nut; and when the first fruit fell, another used to grow." Leaves were always on this useful tree, which stood until Ninine the poet cast it down.18 What is perhaps a debased myth of a world-tree like Yggdrasil is...
Page 50 - Behold the sid before your eyes, It is manifest to you that it is a king's mansion Which was built by the firm Dagda; It was a wonder, a court, an admirable hill.
Page 104 - Complete is my chair in Caer Sidi; Plague and age hurt not him who is in it, They know Manawyddan and Pryderi; Three organs 'round a fire sing before it, And about its points are ocean's streams. And the abundant well above it — Sweeter than white wine the drink of it.
Page 370 - Torlough" by John, son of Rory MacGrath. 5 plates. (Roy. Irish acad. Trans, v. 32, sec. C., p. 133-198. Dublin, 1903.) Cattle-raid (The) of Cualnge. (Tain Bo Cuailnge.) An old-Irish prose-epic, translated for the first time from Leabhar na h-Uidhri and the Yellow Book of Lecan, by LW Faraday.
Page 211 - And everlasting abode of torture. It is a law of pride in this world To believe in the creatures, to forget God, Overthrow by diseases, and old age, Destruction of the soul through deception. A noble salvation will come From the King who has created us, A white law will come over seas; Besides being God, He will be man.

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