The Cambridge History of American Music

Front Cover
David Nicholls
Cambridge University Press, Nov 19, 1998 - Music - 637 pages
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The Cambridge History of American Music, first published in 1998, celebrates the richness of America's musical life. It was the first study of music in the United States to be written by a team of scholars. American music is an intricate tapestry of many cultures, and the History reveals this wide array of influences from Native, European, African, Asian, and other sources. The History begins with a survey of the music of Native Americans and then explores the social, historical, and cultural events of musical life in the period until 1900. Other contributors examine the growth and influence of popular musics, including film and stage music, jazz, rock, and immigrant, folk, and regional musics. The volume also includes valuable chapters on twentieth-century art music, including the experimental, serial, and tonal traditions.
  

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Contents

American Indian musics past and present
3
an overview part 1
30
3Secular music to 1800
49
Sacred music to 1800
78
African American music to 1900
103
6 Immigrant folkand regional musics in the nineteenth century
135
Nineteenthcentury popular music 1
175
8Artmusicfrom18ooto186o
186
The rock and roll era
345
14Ragtime and early jazz
388
Jazz from 1930 to 1960
418
Jazz since 1960
448
Tonal traditions in art music from 1920 to 1960
471
Serialism and complexity
496
Avantgarde and experimental music
517
Tonal traditions in art music since 1960
535

9Art music from 1860 to 1920
214
Immigrant folk and regional musics in the twentieth century
276
12 Popular song and popular music on stage and film
309

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 578 - Trade," in Martin L. Kilson and Robert I. Rotberg, eds., The African Diaspora (Cambridge, Mass., 1976): 115. 21 Wood, Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina, xiv, and " 'More like a Negro Country' ": 149-54; Higgins, "Charleston: Terminus and Entrepot of the Colonial Slave Trade

About the author (1998)

David Nicholls is Professor of Music at the University of Southampton. He is the author of American Experimental Music, 1890-1940 (Cambridge University Press, 1990) and contributing editor of The Whole World of Music: A Henry Cowell Symposium (1997), and The Cambridge Companion to John Cage (2002). He is also editor of the journal American Music.

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