A Concise Dictionary of Akkadian

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Jeremy A. Black, Andrew George, J. N. Postgate
Otto Harrassowitz Verlag, 2000 - Foreign Language Study - 450 pages
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Akkadian, comprising the Babylonian, Assyrian and Old Akkadian dialects, is the earliest known Semitic language, attested from the middle of the 3rd millenium B.C. until the time of Christ. It was widely adopted in the ancient Near East as a written vehicle for scholarship, literature, legal and diplomatic affairs. It is the language of the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Code of Hammurapi, the inscriptions of the kings of Assyria and Babylonia and countless legal and administrative documents.A Concise Dictionary of Akkadian has been prepared for the convenience of students and scholars on the basis of Wolfram von Sodens Akkadisches Handworterbuch updated with reference to the Chicago Assyrian Dictionary and other sources. It aims to include all certainly attested words with variant forms, dialect and period distribution, logographic writings and English meanings (but not textual citations). A list of roots assists in tracking down the right entries.
  

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Correction: magurgurru, means "large boat" and happens to be used in the Sumerian and Babylonian Epic of the Flood, so it might equate to "Ark", but does not of itself, mean "Ark" since no one knows the origin of the word or its actual meaning.

About the author (2000)

Jeremy Black is a professor of history at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom. He is, or has been, on numerous editorial boards, including the "Journal of Military History, the Journal of the Royal United Services Institute, Media History", and "History Today", and was editor of "Archives". He is the author or editor of more than fifty books, including "War and the World: Military Power and the Fate of Continents, 1450-2000" (Yale, 2000), "The British Seaborne Empire" (Yale, 2004), "Maps and History" (Yale, 2000), and "European Warfare in a Global Context, 1600-1815" (Routledge, 2007). He lives in Exeter.

Nicholas Postgate was Professor of Assyriology at the University of Cambridge from 1994 to 2013 and Fellow of Trinity College. He directed excavations at the Sumerian city at Abu Salabikh in South Iraq from 1973 to 1989, and at the Bronze and Iron Age settlement at Kilise Tepe in South Turkey from 1994 to 2012. His articles have been published in Iraq, Revue d'Assyriologie, the Journal of Cuneiform Studies, the Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient, Sumer, and Anatolian Studies. He is author of Early Mesopotamia: Society and Economy at the Dawn of History, editor of several volumes of Assyrian documents, and co-editor of A Concise Dictionary of Akkadian.

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