News from France: Or, A Description of the Library of Cardinal Mazarin, Preceded by the Surrender of the Library (now Newly Translated) (Google eBook)

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A.C. McClurg & Company, 1907 - 75 pages
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Page 66 - I should particularise all the treasures which are heaped together within the compass of seven chambers, filled from top to bottom, whereof a gallery, twelve fathoms high, is reckoned but for one ; it is to these illustrious royal personages, that this city of Paris, and not Paris only, but all France, and not France only, but all Europe, are indebted for a library. Wherein, if the good designs of his eminence had succeeded as happily, as they were forecast wisely, all the world should, before this,...
Page 75 - Can eyes with patience see't in flames involv'd? Methinks the flames should spare it, sure the fir* (More merciful than men) willsav't intire. Ah sweet Apollo hinder! Muses stay Their violence, and what though fond men say, ' It is decreed; the ordinance is made; ' The will of supreme power must be obey'd.
Page 61 - ... whom they strike, and make dumb, or astonish every one that sees them fall : Give me leave to tell you, yet with all respects and submissions possible, that what you thundered out on the twenty-ninth of the last, against the library of the most eminent Cardinal Mazarin, my master, hath produced these two effects, with so much force and violence, that forasmuch as concerns the said library, it is not likely it should ever recover those losses which it hath already suffered, nor yet avoid those...
Page 64 - For it is composed of more than forty thousand volumes, collected by the care of several Kings and Princes in Europe, by all the ambassadors that have set out of France these ten years, into places farthest remote from this kingdom. To tell you that I have made voyages into Flanders, Italy, England, and Germany, to bring hither whatever I could procure that was rare and excellent, is little in comparison of the cares which so many crowned heads have taken to further the laudable designs of His Eminence.
Page 71 - Gentlemen, an inscription, that may noi" be called ancient ; for it is long since it was first spoken of, and though it contain many things, I can assore you, that his Eminence intended somewhat more in his generous design of founding a publick library in the midst of France, under the direction and protection of the prime presidents of three sovereign courts of this city, and of the lord attorney-general, persuading himself, that, by this means, so potent and venerable, posterity would perpetually...
Page 74 - ... it towards this library, which you had three years since, when, by a solemn arrest or ordinance, you resolved it should be preserved, and that I should have the keeping of it : Yet give me leave, gentlemen, to have recourse to the muses, seeing they are so far concerned in the preservation of this new Parnassus, and joining the interest they have in you, with my most humble prayers, speak to you in the same language which the Emperor Augustus used, when the question was, Whether Virgil's iEneids...
Page 68 - Catholicks and Protestants might here try all sorts of passages in authors, and accord all manner of difficulties. And to accumulate all these perfections, to enhance them, and set them in their true lustre ;is it not enough, gentlemen, to shew you assured proofs of His Eminence's intentions, that he resolved to present it to the publick and to make it a common comfort...
Page 67 - ... and turn over, with as much leisure as benefit, all that Egypt, Persia, Greece, Italy, and all the kingdoms of Europe, have given us, that is most singular and admirable. A strange thing, gentlemen, that the best furnished lawyers were constrained to confess their want, when they saw the great collection that I had made of books, in their profession, in this rich library. That the greatest heap of volumes, in physick, were nothing, compared with the number of those which were here gathered in...
Page 68 - I had made of books, in their profession, in this rich library. That the greatest heap of volumes, in physick, were nothing, compared with the number of those which were here gathered in that faculty. That philosophy was here more beautiful, more flourishing, than ever it was in Greece. That Italians, Germans, Spaniards, Englishmen, Polonians, Dutch, and other nations, found here the histories of their own nations, far more rich and better furnished than they could find in their several native countries....

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