Logic, Inductive and Deductive: An Introduction to Scientific Method (Google eBook)

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H. Holt, 1909 - Logic - 304 pages
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Page 97 - If two or more instances in which the phenomenon occurs have only one circumstance in common, while two or more instances in which it does not occur have nothing in common save the absence of that circumstance ; the circumstance in which alone the two sets of instances differ, is the effect, or the cause, or an indispensable part of the cause, of tlte phenomenon.
Page 276 - My theory, on the contrary, is that the bodily changes follow directly the perception of the exciting fact, and that our feeling of the same changes as they occur is the emotion.
Page 279 - If we fancy some strong emotion, and then try to abstract from our consciousness of it all the feelings of its bodily symptoms, we find we have nothing left behind, no "mind-stuff...
Page 276 - Common sense says, we lose our fortune, are sorry and weep; we meet a bear, are frightened and run; we are insulted by a rival, are angry and strike. The hypothesis here to be defended says that this order of sequence is incorrect...
Page 238 - Flower in the crannied wall, If I could understand What you are, root and all, and all in all, I should know what God and man is.
Page 144 - Barbara, Celarent, Darii, Ferioque, prioris; Cesare, Camestres, Festino, Baroko, secundae; Tertia, Darapti, Disamis, Datisi, Felapton, Bokardo, Ferison, habet ; Quarta insuper addit Bramantip, Camenes, Dimaris, Fesapo, Fresison.
Page 92 - If an instance in which the phenomenon under investigation occurs and an instance in which it does not occur have every circumstance in common save one, that one occurring only in the former, the circumstance in which alone the two instances differ is the effect or the cause or an indispensable part of the cause of the phenomenon.
Page 279 - The immense number of parts modified in each emotion is what makes it so difficult for us to reproduce in cold blood the total and integral expression of any one of them. We may catch the trick with the voluntary muscles, but fail with the skin, glands, heart, and other viscera. Just as an artificially imitated sneeze lacks something of the reality, so the attempt to imitate an emotion in the absence of its normal instigating cause is apt to be rather "hollow.
Page 280 - What kind of an emotion of fear would be left, if the feelings neither of quickened heart-beats nor of shallow breathing, neither of trembling lips nor of weakened limbs, neither of goose-flesh nor of visceral stirrings, were present, it is quite impossible to think.
Page 156 - If a statesman who sees his former opinions to be wrong does not alter his course he is guilty of deceit; and if he does alter his course he is open to a charge of inconsistency...

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