Record of a School: Exemplifying the General Principles of Spiritual Culture (Google eBook)

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J. Munroe, 1835 - Moral education - 208 pages
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An Inspirational Read for Classical Homeschoolers

User Review  - Tori - Christianbook.com

The book is notes kept from the woman who worked as Amos Bronson Alcott's secretary at his school; Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, she was so good at keeping notes I felt I was standing in the classroom ... Read full review

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Page 197 - Nature never did betray The heart that loved her : 'tis her privilege, Through all the years of this our life, to lead From joy to joy ; for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith that all which we behold Is...
Page 197 - tis her privilege, Through all the years of this our life, to lead From joy to joy: for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith, that all which we behold Is full of blessings.
Page 44 - This would be an adaptation to actual business of the spiritual truth that " to him that hath shall be given ; but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he seemeth to have.
Page 89 - It was that Mary which anointed the Lord with ointment, and wiped his feet with her hair, whose brother Lazarus was sick.
Page 44 - And he said, Thou hast asked a hard thing ; nevertheless, if thou see me when I am taken from thee, it shall be so unto thee ; but if not, it shall not be so.
Page 175 - Lay not up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal : but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal. For where your treasure is there will your heart be also,
Page 1 - Christ in basso-relievo, fixed into this bookcase, is made to appear to the scholars just over the teacher's head. The bookcase itself is surmounted with a bust of Plato. On the northern side of the room, opposite the door, was the table of the assistant, with a small figure of Atlas bending under the weight of the world.
Page 193 - ... enabling the writers to give unity to their own being by bringing all outward facts into some relation with their individuality, and gathering up fragments which would otherwise be lost, he knows he is also assisting them in the art of composition, in a way that the rules of rhetoric would never do. Every one knows that a technical memory of words and of rules of composition gives very little command of language ; while a rich consciousness, a quick imagination, and force of feeling seem...
Page 110 - He then said, But let us all look back six months ; how many of you look at things, and feel about them, differently from what you did six months ago ? How many of you feel that this school-room is a different place from what it was the first week you were here...
Page 2 - Alcott sat behind his desk, and the children were placed in chairs in a large arc around him; the chairs so far apart that they could not easily touch each other. He then asked each one separately what idea he or she had of the purpose of coming to school. To learn, was the first answer. To learn what? By pursuing this question, all the common exercises of the school were brought up by the children themselves; and various subjects of arts, science, and philosophy.

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