Disaster Response and Recovery: A Handbook for Mental Health Professionals

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DIANE Publishing, 1996 - 144 pages
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A resource on basic, practical issues related to planning & implementing disaster mental health services. Provides specific, concrete information for managers who are involved in planning services as well as practitioners who are delivering services. Chapters include checklists of actions to take before, during, & after a disaster to help staff in carrying out important actions. Provides specific activities to engage in with disaster victims. List of training manuals & materials, videotapes, suggested outreach materials & books for children.
  

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Contents

I
1
II
7
III
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IV
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V
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VII
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VIII
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXIX
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVII
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XVIII
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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Page 110 - What we call the beginning is often the end And to make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from.
Page 110 - I I hardly know, sir, just at present at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.
Page 1 - By individual trauma I mean a blow to the psyche that breaks through one's defenses so suddenly and with such brutal force that one cannot react to it effectively.
Page 4 - ... situations will likely require referral for more intensive psychological counseling. The role of the disaster mental health worker is not to provide treatment for severely disturbed individuals directly but to recognize their needs and help link them with an appropriate treatment resource (Farberow & Frederick, 1978). DISASTER MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES MUST BE UNIQUELY TAILORED TO THE COMMUNITIES THEY SERVE The demographics and characteristics of the communities affected by disaster must be considered...
Page 28 - Professional counseling services to victims of a major disaster in order to relieve mental health problems caused or aggravated by such a major disaster or its aftermath; and (2) Training of disaster workers to provide or assist in providing those professional counseling services.
Page 28 - Aging (NIA), and the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) within the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Although we generally agree with others in the mental health community about the importance of sustained and adequate Federal funding for mental health research and treatment, AAGP brings a unique perspective to these issues because of the elderly patient population served...
Page 2 - ... Diminished cognitive functioning (short-term memory loss, confusion, difficulty setting priorities and making decisions, etc.) may occur because of stress and fatigue. This can impair survivors' ability to make sound decisions and take necessary steps toward recovery and reconstruction. MANY DISASTER STRESS REACTIONS ARE NORMAL RESPONSES TO AN ABNORMAL SITUATION Most disaster survivors are normal persons who function reasonably well under the responsibilities and stresses of everyday life. However,...
Page 25 - ... which conditions by reason of their magnitude, are or are likely to be beyond the control of the services, personnel, equipment, and facilities of any single county, city and county, or city and require the combined forces of a mutual aid region or regions to combat.
Page 92 - Darmstadt, December 11, 1866 Beloved, precious Mama; On awakening this morning, my first thoughts were of you and of dear darling Papa! Oh, how it reopens the wounds scarcely healed, when this day of pain and anguish returns! This season of the year, the leafless trees, the cold light, everything reminds me of that time! Happily married as 1 am, and with such a good, excellent and loving husband , how far more can 1 understand now the depth of that grief which tore your lives asunder!
Page 2 - Zunin (1991) emphasize that the grief responses to such losses are common and are not pathological (warranting therapy or counseling) unless the grief is an intensification, a prolongation, or an inhibition of normal grief. Relief from stress, the ability to talk about the experience, and the passage of time usually lead to the reestablishment of equilibrium. Public information about normal reactions, education about ways to handle them, and early attention to symptoms that are problematic can speed...

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