Letters from London: Seven Essays by C.L.R. James

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Signal Books, Jan 1, 2003 - Bloomsbury (London, England) - 144 pages
1 Review
In 1932 C.L.R. James left his home in Trinidad for the first time and sailed to the United Kingdom to fulfil his literary ambitions. During his first weeks in London he wrote a series of vigorously opinionated essays for the Port of Spain Gazette, giving his impressions of the city and its inhabitants, and describing his progress through the Bohemian circles of Bloomsbury. Here these essays, written in a crucial period of James's life, are published for the first time in seventy years.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kidzdoc - LibraryThing

C.L.R. James (1901-1989) was a famous historian, Marxist, and postcolonial theorist, as well as an avid cricket enthusiast. He was born and educated in Trinidad, and worked as a teacher, journalist ... Read full review

Review: Letters from London: Seven Essays by CLR James

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

Whether I will ever end up reading this is questionable, but had it been published just a little bit earlier I'm sure it would've shed some interesting light on my undergrad thesis, which was in part ... Read full review

Contents

III
1
IV
17
V
37
VI
57
VII
73
VIII
91
IX
109
X
126
XI
140
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About the author (2003)

A native of Trinidad, C. L. R. James grew up in a very respectable middle-class black family steeped in British manners and culture. Although justifiably well-known in the British world as a writer, historian, and political activist, his contributions have been underappreciated in the United States. A student of history, literature, philosophy, and culture, James thought widely and wrote provocatively. He also turned his words into deeds as a journalist, a Trotskyite, a Pan-African activist, a Trinidadian nationalist politican, a university teacher, and a government official. James was a teacher and magazine editor in Trinidad until the early 1930s, when he went to England and became a sports writer for the Manchester Guardian. While in England he became a dedicated Marxist organizer. In 1938 he moved to the United States and continued his political activities, founding an organization dedicated to the principles of Trotskyism. His politics led to his expulsion from the United States in 1953, and he returned to Trinidad, from which he was also expelled in the early 1960s. He spent the remainder of his life in England. Among James's extensive writings, the two most influential volumes are Black Jacobins (1967), a study of the anti-French Dominican (Haitian) slave rebellion of the 1790s, and Beyond a Boundary (1963), a remarkable exploration of sport, specifically cricket, as social and political history. Other important works include A History of Negro Revolt (1938) and The Life of Captain Cipriani (1932). James represents an unusual combination of activist-reformer (even revolutionary) and promoter of the best in art, culture, and gentility.

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