The Renaissance in Rome

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Indiana University Press, Jan 1, 1998 - History - 444 pages
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From the middle of the fifteenth century a distinctively Roman Renaissance occurred. A shared outlook, a persistent set of intellectual concerns, similar cultural assumptions and a commitment to common ideological aims bound Roman humanists and artists to a uniquely Roman world, different from Florence, Venice, and other Italian and European centers.This book provides the first comprehensive portrait of the Roman Renaissance world. Charles Stinger probes the basic attitudes, the underlying values and the core convictions that Rome's intellectuals and artists experienced, lived for, and believed in from Pope Eugenius IV's reign to the Eternal City in 1443 to the sacking of 1527. He demonstrates that the Roman Renaissance was not the creation of one towering intellectual leader, or of a single identifiable group; rather, it embodied the aspirations of dozens of figures, active over an eighty-year period.Stinger illuminates the general aims and character of the Roman Renaissance. Remaining mindful of the economic, social, and political context--Rome's retarded economic growth, the papacy's increasing entanglement in Italian politics, papal preoccupation with the crusade against the Ottomans, and the effects of papal fiscal and administrative practices--Stinger nevertheless maintains that these developments recede in importance before the cultural history of the period. Only in the context of the ideological and cultural commitments of Roman humanists, artists, and architects can one fully understand the motivation for papal policies. Reality for Renaissance Romans was intricately bound up with the notion of Rome's mythic destiny.The Renaissance in Rome is cultural history at its best. It evokes the moods, myths, images, and symbols of the Eternal City, as they are manifested in the Liturgy, ceremony, festivals, oratory, art, and architecture of Renaissance Rome. Throughout, Stinger focuses on a persistent constellation of fundamental themes: the image of the city of Rome, the restoration of the Roman Church, the renewal of the Roman Empire, and the fullness of time. He describes and analyzes the content, meaning, origin, and implications of these central ideas of Roman Renaissance.This book will prove interesting to both Renaissance and Reformation scholars, as well as to general readers, who may have visited (or plan to visit) Rome and have become fascinated and affected by this extraordinary city. "There is no other book like it in any language," says Renaissance historian John O'Malley. "It presents a coherent view of Roman culture....collects and presents a vast amount of information never before housed under one roof. Anyone who teaches the Italian Renaissance," O'Malley stresses, "will have to know this book."
  

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Contents

Urbs Roma
14
The Roman Campagna and surrounding region
16
The City of Rome in the Renaissance period 2223
22
The Rioni of Rome
25
The Papal States in the late fifteenth century 1oo 5 The Borgo Leonino Vatican region in the early sixteenth century 265
26
Topography and Urban Realities 14 Rome of the Pilgrims
31
Masolino The Founding of the Church of S Maria Maggiore
35
Classicizing Roman miniature from the pontificate of Sixtus IV
64
Antonio Pollaiuolo Tomb of Sixtus IV detail of Theology
148
Botticelli Healing of the Leper
153
The Primacy of Peter Princeps Apostolorum
156
Pius II receiving the relic of St Andrews head drawing attributed to Ventura Salimbeni
176
Tomb of Pius II detail of reception of St Andrews head
178
Bramante Tempietto of S Pietro in Montorio
186
Raphael tapestry the Charge to Peter
193
Raphael Disputa
197

View of Rome by Pietro del Massaio
68
Liturgy and Ceremony 46 The Ancient City 59 The Subterra
76
The Renaissance Papacy and
83
Coronation medal of Sixtus IV
88
Rocca at Ostia
103
Julius II as Triumphator
110
Medal of Sixtus IV commemorating liberation of Otranto from the Ottoman Turks
116
The Renaissance Popes 83 Italian Politics 96 Europe
123
Theological Developments
140
1o Filippino Lippi Triumph of St Thomas Aquinas
145
Raphael Disputa detail
198
Raphael School of Athens
201
Papalism vs Conciliarism 158 Humanists and the Primatus
226
The Renovatio Imperil and the Renovatio Romae
235
The Roman Imperium and the Pope as Caesar 238 Augustus
282
The Sack and Its Aftermath
320
Conclusion
333
NOTES
339
INDEX
429
Copyright

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