"These from the Land of Sinim.": Essays on the Chinese Question. With Appendices (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Chapman & Hall, 1901 - Eastern question (Far East) - 254 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 119 - The position the Chinese take up may be said to be this : " We did not invite you foreigners here," they say ; " you crossed the seas of your own accord and more or less forced yourselves on us. We generously permitted the trade you were at first satisfied with, but what return did you make ? To the trade we sanctioned you added...
Page 52 - China for the Chinese and out with the foreigners ! " The Boxer move\, ment is doubtless the product of official inspiration, but it has taken hold of the popular imagination, and will spread like wildfire all over the length and breadth of the country ; it is, in short, a purely patriotic volunteer movement, and its object is to strengthen China and for a Chinese programme.
Page 52 - You are all too anxious to awake us and start us on a new road, and you will do it ; but you will all regret it, for, once awake and started, we shall go fast and far farther than you think much farther than you want...
Page 142 - Honour thy father and thy mother" been so religiously obeyed, or so fully and without exception given effect to, and it is in fact the keynote of their family, social, official, and national life, and because it is so " their days are long in the land God has given them.
Page 142 - ... literature, and everywhere they have their literary clubs and coteries for learning and discussing each other's essays and verses ; they possess and practise an admirable system of ethics, and they are generous, charitable, and fond of good works; they never forget a...
Page 18 - Boxers to deal with, but on the i9th, we were surprised by a Circular Note from the Yamen (Chinese Foreign Office), stating that the foreign naval authorities at Tien-tsin were about to seize the Taku forts, and ordering Legations to quit Peking within twenty-four hours. The Legations replied, and represented to the Yamen that they knew nothing of the Taku occurrence that they regretted any misunderstanding and that they could not possibly quit, or make transport arrangements, on such short...
Page 55 - In fifty years' time there will be millions of Boxers in serried ranks and war's panoply at the call of the Chinese Government...
Page 6 - I, and men of the same stamp and standing, and their advice to the throne was to try conclusions with foreigners and yield no more to their demands. However mistaken may have been their reading of foreigners, and however wrong their manner of action, these men eminent in their own country for their learning and services were animated by patriotism, were enraged at foreign dictation, and had the courage of their convictions...
Page 121 - ... with them, and instead of the welcome their good intentions merit, localities and officials turn against them. When called on to indemnify them for losses, we find to our astonishment that it is the exactions of would-be millionaires we have to satisfy ! Your people are everywhere extra-territorialized ; but, instead of a grateful return for this ill-advised stipulation, they appear to act as if there were no laws in China, and this encourages native lawlessness and makes constant difficulties...
Page 178 - But foreign governments, although their objects in negotiating for the most-favored-nation- clause were similar to those of China, are not always fair in their interpretation of it. For example, if China, for a consideration, grants a certain country a new privilege on such and such conditions, this would be of the nature of a special concession for a special consideration. Should other countries come forward and, in virtue of the...

Bibliographic information