Clinical Infectious Disease (Google eBook)

Front Cover
David Schlossberg
Cambridge University Press, May 12, 2008 - Medical
1 Review
This clinically-oriented text focuses on the diagnostic protocols and treatment strategies with which physicians must be familiar when managing infectious disease patients. Informative algorithms, tables, and high-quality color photographs supplement many of the chapters in this conveniently-sized volume. The orientation of the volume is multi-faceted: in addition to the traditional organization of organ system and pathogen-related information, this text includes specific sections on the susceptible host (with individual chapters on the diabetic, the elderly, the injection drug user, and the neonate), travel-related infections, nosocomial infections, infections related to surgery and trauma, and bioterrorism. Informative algorithms, tables, and high-quality color photographs supplement many of the chapters. The convenient size of this book places it between the available encyclopedic tomes and the small pocket guides, making it a comprehensive but user-friendly and practical reference for the practising clinician.
  

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Some viruses such as coxsackie B infect the myocytes themselves; others, for
instance ... Induced proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis p271

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Contents

103 HospitalAcquired Fever
745
104 TransfusionRelated Infection
749
105 Intravascular CatheterRelated Infections
755
106 Infections Associated with Urinary Catheters
761
PART XIV
767
107 Postoperative Wound Infections
769
108 TraumaRelated Infection
775
109 Infected Implants
779

8 Dental Infection and Its Consequences
59
9 Infection of the Salivary and Lacrimal Glands
65
10 Deep Neck Infections
73
PART III
77
11 Conjunctivitis
79
12 Keratitis
87
Keratitis Isolates 19932006
88
13 Iritis
97
14 Retinitis
103
15 Endophthalmitis
109
16 Periocular Infections
117
PART IV
121
17 Fever and Rash
123
18 Staphylococcal and Streptococcal Toxic Shock
129
19 Classic Viral Exanthems
135
20 Skin Ulcer and Pyoderma
141
21 Cellulitis and Erysipelas
151
Necrotizing Fasciitis
157
23 Human and Animal Bites
161
24 Lice Scabies and Myiasis
167
25 Superficial Fungal Diseases of the Hair Skin and Nails
173
Figure 2510 Method for
179
26 Mycetoma Madura Foot
181
27 Fever and Lymphadenopathy
187
Clinical Syndromes
195
28 Acute and Chronic Bronchitis
197
29 Croup Supraglottitis and Laryngitis
205
30 Atypical Pneumonia
211
31 CommunityAcquired Pneumonia
221
32 Nosocomial Pneumonia
229
33 Aspiration Pneumonia
233
Figure 331 K pneumoniae
236
34 Lung Abscess
241
35 Empyema and Bronchopleural Fistula
245
PART VI
251
37 Acute Pericarditis
265
I
268
38 Myocarditis
271
39 Mediastinitis
279
40 Vascular Infection
285
Table 401 Diagnosis and Management of Mycotic Aneurysms
288
Imaging
289
41 Pacemaker Defibrillator and VAD Infections
293
PART VII
297
42 Acute Viral Hepatitis
299
43 Chronic Hepatitis
309
Cholecystitis and Cholangitis
321
45 Pyogenic Liver Abscess
327
46 Infectious Complications of Acute Pancreatitis
331
47 Esophageal Infections
339
48 Gastroenteritis
349
49 Food Poisoning
359
50 AntibioticAssociated Diarrhea
367
51 Sexually Transmitted Enteric Infections
371
52 Acute Appendicitis
377
53 Diverticulitis
381
54 Abdominal Abscess
387
55 Splenic Abscess
391
56 Peritonitis
397
57 Whipples Disease and Sprue
403
PART VIII
407
58 Urethritis and Dysuria
409
59 Vaginitis and Cervicitis
415
60 EpididymoOrchitis
427
61 Genital Ulcer Adenopathy Syndrome
433
62 Prostatitis
441
63 Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
445
64 Urinary Tract Infection
449
65 Candiduria
457
66 Focal Renal Infections and Papillary Necrosis
461
PART IX
467
67 Infection of Native and Prosthetic Joints
469
68 Bursitis
475
69 Acute and Chronic Osteomyelitis
479
70 Polyarthritis and Fever
485
71 Infectious Polymyositis
491
72 Psoas Abscess
495
Clinical Syndromes
503
73 Bacterial Meningitis
505
74 Aseptic Meningitis Syndrome
513
75 Acute Viral Encephalitis
521
76 Intracranial Suppuration
531
Diagnosis and Management
541
78 Myelitis and Peripheral Neuropathy
547
79 Reyes Syndrome
563
80 Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy
569
81 Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt Infections
575
82 Prion Diseases
581
PART XI
585
83 Evaluation of Suspected Immunodeficiency
587
84 Infections in the Neutropenic Patient
593
85 Infections in Patients with Neoplastic Disease
601
86 Corticosteroids Cytotoxic Agents and Infection
605
87 Infections in Transplant Patients
611
88 Diabetes and Infection
625
89 Infectious Complications in the Injection Drug User
631
90 Infections in the Alcoholic
637
91 Infections in the Elderly
643
92 Neonatal Infection
647
Infectious Risks
655
94 DialysisRelated Infection
663
95 Overwhelming Postsplenectomy Infection
671
PART XII
679
Initial Evaluation and Monitoring
681
Antiretroviral Therapy
689
98 Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome
699
99 Differential Diagnosis and Management of Opportunistic
707
100 Prophylaxis of Opportunistic Infections in HIV Infection
721
PART XIII
731
101 Prevention of Nosocomial Infection in Staff
733
Risks and Management
739
110 Infection in the BurnInjured Patient
783
111 Nonsurgical Antimicrobial Prophylaxis
791
112 Surgical Prophylaxis
797
113 Immunizations
807
continued
810
PART XVI
823
114 Advice for Travelers
825
115 Fever in the Returning Traveler
833
116 Systemic Infection from Animals
837
117 TickBorne Disease
845
118 Recreational Water Exposure
849
119 Travelers Diarrhea
859
120 Bioterrorism
865
PART XVIII
879
121 Actinomycosis
881
122 Anaerobic Infections
887
123 Anthrax and Other Bacillus Species
897
124 Bartonellosis Carrións Disease
903
125 Cat Scratch Disease and Other Bartonella Infections
905
126 Bordetella
913
127 Moraxella Branhamella catarrhalis
917
128 Brucellosis
921
129 Campylobacter
925
130 Clostridia
929
131 Corynebacteria
937
132 Enterobacteriaceae
945
133 Enterococcus
953
134 Erysipelothrix
961
135 HACEK
965
136 Helicobacter Pylori
969
Neisseria Gonorrhoeae
977
138 Haemophilus
983
139 Legionellosis
987
140 Leprosy
993
141 Meningococcus and Miscellaneous Neisseriae
997
142 Listeria
1005
143 Nocardia
1013
144 Pasteurella Multocida
1017
145 Pneumococcus
1023
A B
1025
146 Pseudomonas Stenotrophomonas and Burkholderia
1031
147 RatBite Fevers
1039
148 Salmonella
1043
149 Staphylococcus
1049
150 Streptococcus Groups A B C D and G
1055
151 Viridans Streptococci
1061
152 Poststreptococcal Immunologic Complications
1065
153 Shigella
1069
154 Tularemia
1073
155 Tuberculosis
1077
156 Nontuberculous Mycobacteria
1087
157 Vibrios
1095
158 Yersinia
1099
159 Miscellaneous GramPositive Organisms
1103
160 Miscellaneous GramNegative Organisms
1111
161 Syphilis and Other Treponematoses
1121
162 Lyme Disease
1127
163 Relapsing Fever
1135
164 Leptospirosis
1139
165 Mycoplasma
1145
166 Chlamydia Pneumoniae
1157
167 Chlamydia Psittaci Psittacosis
1161
168 Rickettsial Infections
1167
169 Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis
1173
PART XXII
1177
170 Candidiasis
1179
171 Aspergillosis
1187
172 Zygomycosis Mucormycosis
1195
173 Sporotrichosis
1201
174 Cryptococcus
1205
175 Histoplasmosis
1211
176 Blastomycosis
1215
177 Coccidioidomycosis
1219
178 Pneumocystis Pneumonia
1229
179 Miscellaneous Fungi and Algae
1233
PART XXIII
1237
180 Cytomegalovirus
1239
181 Dengue and DengueLike Illness
1247
182 Enteroviruses
1251
183 EpsteinBarr Virus and Other Causes of the Mononucleosis
1263
184 Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome in the Americas
1271
185 Herpes Simplex Viruses 1 and 2
1275
186 Human Herpesviruses 6 7 and 8
1281
187 Influenza
1289
188 Papillomavirus
1295
189 Acute and Chronic Parvovirus Infection
1301
190 Rabies
1305
191 VaricellaZoster Virus
1311
192 Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers
1319
D
1324
PART XXIV
1333
193 Intestinal Roundworms
1335
1
1336
194 Tissue Nematodes
1343
195 Schistosomes and Other Trematodes
1353
196 Tapeworms Cestodes
1359
197 Toxoplasma
1365
Treatment and Prophylaxis
1371
199 Human Babesiosis
1381
200 Trypanosomiases and Leishmaniases
1389
201 Intestinal Protozoa
1399
202 Extraintestinal Amebic Infection
1405
PART XXV
1411
203 Principles of Antibiotic Therapy
1413
204 Antifungal Therapy
1423
205 Antiviral Therapy
1433
206 Hypersensitivity to Antibiotics
1445
207 Antimicrobial Agent Tables
1457
Table 2073 continued
1480
Table 2075 continued
1496

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Page 19 - Bernard GR, Vincent JL, Laterre PF, et al. Efficacy and safety of recombinant human activated protein C for severe sepsis.

About the author (2008)

David Schlossberg, MD, FACP, is Professor of Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, Adjunct Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, and Director of the Tuberculosis Control Program for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a Fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. In addition to winning numerous teaching awards, he has been invited to lecture throughout the United States and East Asia. He is a reviewer for a number of medical journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, Clinical Infectious Diseases, the Annals of Internal Medicine, The Journal of Infectious Disease, and JAMA, and has written or edited 20 books in the area of Infectious Disease.

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