The Works of John Dryden, Volume VII: Poems, 1697-1700 (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, Aug 2, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 1001 pages
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Dryden's last three years of published works begin with "Alexander's Feast "and end with "Fables, "his largest miscellany of poetical translations. "Alexander's Feast, "like the earlier "Song for St. Cecilia's Day "("Works, III"), was commissioned by the Musical Society for performance at its annual tribute to sacred music. The "Fables "included selections from Homer, Ovid, Boccaccio, and Chaucer. Extensive and detailed notes to these translations show readers how well Dryden succeeded in transmitting the styles and the very sounds of his originals. "Volume VII "ends with a section of miscellaneous pieces published at other times, including Dryden's only known Latin work. The presentation of the writings in this volume, like that of the entire twenty-volume series, is a tribute not only to Dryden but also to the editors who have guided it through five decades.
  

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Contents

Of the Pythagorean Philosophy From Ovids Metamorphoses Book XV
484
The Character of a Good Parson Imitated from Chaucer and Inlargd
506
The Monument of a Fair Maiden Lady Who dyd at Bath and is there Interrd
511
Cymon and Iphigenia from Boccace
513
Prologue to Julius Caesar
535
Epitaphs
537
On the Monument of the Marquis of Winchester
538
Epitaph on Sir Palmes Fairborne
539

Out of the Eighth Book of Ovids Metamorphoses
203
Sigismonda and Guiscardo from Boccace
216
Out of the Eighth Book of Ovids Metamorphoses
238
Out of the Tenth Book of Ovids Metamorphoses
244
Out of the Tenth Book of Ovids Metamorphoses
248
The First Book of Homers Ilias
260
Or The Tale of the Nuns Priest
287
Theodore and Honoria from Boccace
336
Out of the Tenth Book of Ovids Metamorphoses
349
The Flower and the Leaf Or The Lady in the Arbour A Vision
365
The Twelfth Book of Ovid his Metamorphoses Wholly Translated
406
The Speeches of Ajax and Ulysses From Ovids Metamorphoses Book XIII
432
The Wife of Bath Her Tale
451
Upon Young Mr Rogers of Glocestershire
540
Epitaph on Erasmus Lawton
541
Impromptus
542
The Fair Stranger
543
A Pastoral Elegy
544
A Song
547
Aesacus transformd into a Cormorant
548
COMMENTARY
551
TEXTUAL NOTES
937
Documents Relating to the Production of the Fables
953
Middle English Glossary
955
INDEX TO THE COMMENTARY
969
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Born August 9, 1631 into a wealthy Puritan family, John Dryden received an excellent education at Westminster School and Cambridge University. After a brief period in government, he turned his attention almost entirely to writing. Dryden was one of the first English writers to make his living strictly by writing, but this meant he had to cater to popular taste. His long career was astonishingly varied, and he turned his exceptional talents to almost all literary forms. Dryden dominated the entire Restoration period as a poet, playwright, and all-round man of letters. He was the third poet laureate of England. In his old age Dryden was virtually a literary "dictator" in England, with an immense influence on eighteenth-century poetry. His verse form and his brilliant satires became models for other poets, but they could rarely equal his standard. Dryden was also a master of "occasional" poetry - verse written for a specific person or special occasion. Like most poets of his time, Dryden saw poetry as a way of expressing ideas rather than emotions, which makes his poetry seem cool and impersonal to some modern readers. Dryden also wrote numerous plays that helped him make him one of the leading figures in the Restoration theatre. Today, however he is admired more for his influence on other writers than for his own works. He died on April 30, 1700 in London.

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