Jane Austen's Art of Memory

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 28, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 284 pages
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Jane Austen's Art of Memory offers a radical new thesis about Jane Austen's construction of her art. It argues that, with the help of her tenacious memory, she engaged in friendly dialogue with her predecessors, the English writers, a process that the eighteenth century called 'imitation'. Her allusions, far from being random, thicken and complicate her novels in a manner that is poetic rather than mimetic. Difficult critical cruxes resolve when her books are set within her own great tradition which included Locke, Richardson, Milton, Shakespeare, and (unexpectedly) Chaucer, and she is found to be an educated and supremely conscious writer.
  

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Contents

Northanger Abbey
1
Catherine Morlands education
2
The dark room of the understanding
9
Catherine Morlands general integrity
13
A right popular philosopher
26
The return to Richardson
34
Sense and Sensibility
48
Pamela and Sir Charles Grandison
49
The paradisal park
159
If not Authors Carvers
164
Emma
169
Persuasion
188
The Loathly Lady
190
Gentillesse as rank wealth and beauty
195
Gentillesse as outward appearance
201
Maistrie
205

Clarissa
55
Paradise Lost
71
Pride and Prejudice
84
Intricate characters are the most amusing
98
three proposals
112
Mansfield Park
130
My Tutor my Brother my Friend
145
Careless as a woman and a friend
149
The constancy of women
208
Nothing can come of nothing
213
The History of Sir Charles Grandison
222
Sir Charles Grandison in the juvenilia
228
Notes
239
Bibliography
256
Index
267
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Jocelyn Harris is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Otago, New Zealand.

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