Prophecy and Politics: Socialism, Nationalism, and the Russian Jews, 1862-1917

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 8, 1984 - History - 686 pages
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In the period from 1881 to 1917 socialist movements flourished in every major centre of Russian Jewish life, but, despite common foundations, there was often profound and bitter disagreement between them. This book describes the formation and evolution of these movements, which were at once united by a powerful vision and sundered by the contradictions of practical politics.
  

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Contents

Preface
ix
Glossary
xiii
Introduction
1
Part 1 The preparty stage
5
Moses Hess and Aron Liberman
6
The RussianJewish crisis 18811882
49
Part II The party ideologies until 1907
133
19051906
134
7 Ber Borochov and Marxist Zionism 19031907
329
Ideology and émigré realities
365
RussianJewish youth in Palestine 19041914
366
The socialists in AmericanJewish politics 18971918
453
The American Jewish Congress and Russian Jewry 19151919
548
Conclusion
552
Notes
561
Bibliography
630

Between nation and class
171
Russian populist and Jewish socialist 18871907
258
On the populist and prophetic strands in socialist Zionism 18811907
288

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About the author (1984)

The Studies in Contemporary Jewry series is edited by Jonathan Frankel, Eli Lederhendler, Peter Y. Medding, and Ezra Mendelsohn, who teach Jewish history, society, and politics at The Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Jonathan Frankel, the editor of Volume XX, is the Tamara and Saveli Grinberg
Professor Emeritus of Russian Studies and Professor Emeritus at the Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry at The Hebrew University. He is author of a number of books including The Damascus Affair: "Ritual Murder," Politics and the Jews in 1840. The symposium is co-edited by Dan Diner,
Professor of History at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and director of the Simon-Dubnow Institute for Jewish History and Culture at the University of Leipzig.

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