Patronymica Britannica, a dictionary of the family names of the United Kingdom (Google eBook)

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1860
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Page 363 - I heard a great peer of this realm, and a learned, say, when he lived, there was no king in Christendom had such a subject as Oxford.
Page 154 - Ericks, who derive their lineage from Erick the forester, a great commander, who raised an army to oppose the invasion of William the Conqueror, by whom he was vanquished, but afterward employed to command that prince's forces ; and in his old age retired to his house in Leicestershire, where his family hath continued ever since, but declining every age, and are now in the condition of very private gentlemen.
Page 278 - A bird's nest. Mark it well ! — within, without ; No tool had he that wrought — no knife to cut, No nail to fix — no bodkin to insert — No glue to join ; his little beak was all. And yet how neatly finished ! What nice hand. With every implement and means of art, And twenty years...
Page 363 - ... times, when the government was unsettled and the kingdom in competition. I have laboured to make a covenant with myself that affection may not press upon judgment, for I suppose there is no man that hath any apprehension of gentry or nobleness, but his affection stands to the continuance of so noble a name and house, and would take hold of a twig or a twine-thread to uphold it.
Page 416 - She hath a way to chase despair, To heal all grief, to cure all care, Turn foulest night to fairest day ; Thou know'st, fond heart, Ann hath a way.
Page 363 - And yet Time hath his revolutions ; there must be a period and an end to all temporal things— -finis rerum, an end of names and dignities, and whatsoever is terrene, and why not of De Vere ? For where is Bohun ? Where is Mowbray ? Where is Mortimer ? Nay, which is more and most of all, where is Plantagenet ? They are entombed in the urns and sepulchres of mortality. And yet let the name and dignity of De Vere stand so long as it pleaseth God!
Page 384 - Men,' and are believed to possess the most extraordinary power in remedying all diseases incidental to the brute creation, as well as the human race, to discover lost or stolen property, and to foretell future events. One of these wretches was a few years ago living at Stokesley, in the North Riding of Yorkshire ; his name was John...
Page 443 - The text is so pleasing that we scarcely dream of its sterling value ; and it seems as if, in unison with the woodcuts, which so cleverly explain its points and adorn its various topics, the whole design were intended for a relaxation from study, rather than an ample exposition of an extraordinary and universal custom, which produced the most important effect upon the minds and habits of mankind.
Page 443 - LOWER'S (MA) Chronicle of Battel Abbey, in Sussex, originally compiled in Latin by a Monk of the Establishment, and now first translated, with Notes and an Abstract of the Subsequent History of the Abbey.
Page xxiii - It is only by adding his occupation, place of abode, or some other special designation, that a particular person can be identified when spoken of, and confusion avoided in the ordinary affairs of life. The name of John Jones is a perpetual incognito in Wales, and being proclaimed at the cross of a market town would indicate no one in particular.

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