High school geography (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1922 - Geography - 577 pages
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Page 378 - IN one of the most progressive and productive countries of the world, and in that section of the country which has had its civilization and its wealth longest, we find a large area where the people are still living the frontier life of the backwoods, where the civilization is that of the eighteenth century, where the people speak the English of Shakespeare's time, where the large majority of the inhabitants have never seen a steamboat or a railroad, where money is as scarce as in colonial days, and...
Page 406 - Investigation to determine what would be reasonable class rates throughout the territory lying north of the Ohio and Potomac Rivers and east of the Mississippi River and the west bank of Lake Michigan.
Page 378 - The sheets, blankets, and counterpanes had all been woven by her, as also the linsey-woolsey from which her own and her children's clothes were made. Gourds, hung on the walls, served as receptacles for salt, soda and other kitchen supplies. The meal-barrel was a section of log, hollowed out with great nicety till the wood was not more than an inch thick. The flour-barrel was a large firkin, the parts held in place by hoops, fastened by an arrowhead at one end of the withe slipped into a slit in...
Page 379 - ... the other ; the churn was made in the same way, and in neither was there nail or screw. The washtub was a trough hollowed out of a log. A large basket was woven of hickory slips by the mountaineer himself, and two smaller ones, made of the cane of the broom corn and bound at the edges with coloured calico, were the handiwork of his wife. Only the iron stove with its few utensils, and some table knives, testified to any connection with the outside world. The old flint-lock gun and powderhorn hanging...
Page 303 - If considerations of humanity or any other moral idea prevent, him from engaging in raids upon the tribes around him the doom of his family is sealed, for his children die of hunger. Thus through the thousands of years since Semitic nomads first lived in Arabia, the hard conditions of climate have steadily weeded out all who withheld their hands...
Page 376 - By reasonable thrift, we can produce a constant timber supply beyond our present need, and with it conserve the usefulness of our streams for irrigation, water supply, navigation, and power. Under right management, our forests will yield over four times as much as now.
Page 364 - THE LIFE OF A FOREST. The history of the life of a forest is a story of the help and harm which the trees receive from one another. On one side every tree is engaged in a relentless struggle against its neighbors for light, water, and food, the three things trees need most. On the other side, each tree is constantly working with all its neighbors, even those which stand at some distance, to bring about the best condition of the soil and air for the growth and fighting power of every other tree.
Page 303 - The man who is starving has little thought of right or wrong. To have such thoughts would seem to him fatal. If considerations of humanity or any other moral...
Page 379 - ... great nicety till the wood was not more than an inch thick. The flour-barrel was a large firkin, the parts held in place by hoops, fastened by an arrowhead at one end of the withe slipped into a slit in the other ; the churn was made in the same way, and in neither was there nail or screw. The washtub was a trough hollowed out of a log. A large basket was woven of hickory slips by the mountaineer himself, and two smaller ones made of the cane of the broom corn and bound at the edges with coloured...

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