The British Plutarch, Or Biographical Entertainer: Being a Select Collection of the Lives ... of the Most Eminent Men ... of Great Britain and Ireland ; from the Reign of Henry VIII. to George II. Both Inclusive ... (Google eBook)

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pl., port., 1762 - British
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Page 128 - Three poets in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn; The first in loftiness of thought surpassed, The next in majesty; in both the last. The force of Nature could no further go, To make a third she joined the former two.
Page 10 - He had, by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company ; and amongst them, some that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing, engaged him more than once in robbing a park that belonged to Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote, near Stratford.
Page 21 - ... between penetration and felicity, he hits upon that particular point on which the bent of each argument turns, or the force of each motive depends.
Page 65 - Beg my dead body which, living, was denied thee, and either lay it at Sherborne, if the land continue, or in Exeter church by my father and mother. I can say no more time and death call me away.
Page 138 - Strafford of high treason, for endeavouring to subvert the ancient and fundamental laws and government of His Majesty's realms of England and Ireland, and to introduce an arbitrary and tyrannical government...
Page 20 - His wit was in his own power; would the rule of it had been so too. Many times he fell into those things could not escape laughter, as when he said in the person of Caesar, one speaking to him, "Caesar, thou dost me wrong," he replied, "Caesar did never wrong but with just cause"; and such like, which were ridiculous.
Page 65 - ... accusers; and send us to meet in his glorious kingdom ! My dear wife, farewell! Bless my poor boy, pray for me, and let my good God hold you. both in his arms ! Written with the dying hand of sometime thy husband, but now, alas! overthrown...
Page 9 - twixt the green sea and the azur'd vault Set roaring war; to the dread rattling thunder Have I given fire, and rifted Jove's stout oak With his own bolt; the strong-bas'd promontory Have I made shake, and by the spurs pluck'd up The pine and cedar; graves at my command Have wak'd their sleepers, op'd, and let 'em forth By my so potent art.
Page 63 - I trust my blood will quench their malice that have thus cruelly murdered me, and that they will not seek also to kill thee and thine with extreme poverty. To what friend to direct thee I know not, for all mine have left me in the true time of trial; and I plainly perceive that my death was determined from the first day.
Page 5 - I cannot determine; but it is plain he had much reading at least, if they will not call it learning. Nor is it any great matter, if a man has knowledge, whether he has it from one language or from another.

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