Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum Palaestinae (CIAP).: D-F. Volume three, Part 1, Volume 30

Front Cover
BRILL, Jan 1, 2004 - History - 346 pages
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Western Palestine is extremely rich in Arabic inscriptions, whose dates range from as early as CE 150 until modern times. Most of the inscriptions date from the Islamic period, for under Islam the country gained particular religious and strategic importance, even though it made up only part of the larger province of Syria. This historical importance is clearly reflected in the hundreds of inscriptions, the texts of which cover a variety of topics: construction, dedication, religious endowments, epitaphs, Qur'anic texts, prayers and invocations, all now assembled in the "Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum Palaestinae" ("CIAP"). The "CIAP" follows the method established at the end of last century by Max van Berchem, namely, the studying of the Arabic inscriptions 'in context'. Van Berchem managed to publish two volumes of the inscriptions from Jerusalem: the "CIAP" covers the entire country. The inscriptions are arranged according to site, and are studied in their respective topographical, historical and cultural context. In this way the "CIAP" offers more than a survey of inscriptions: it represents the epigraphical angle of the geographical history of the Holy Land. Volume One: A, has been published in 1997 and Volume Two: -B-C- in 1999. Both volumes are still available.
  

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Contents

Dabbūriyah
1
Dalātah
5
Dāmmūn
7
Dayr alBalah
11
Dayr Dubbān
20
Dayr Ghassānah
36
Dayr hajlah
48
Dayr hannā
55
Dortantūrah
142
Eilat
148
Ein hajlah
153
Einabūs
154
Ein Kārim
155
Ein MarzevEin Zurayb
159
Fālūjah
182
Farkhah Farkhā
188

Dayr Istiyā
62
Dayr alQalt
69
Dayr anNabī Samwīl
114
Dayshūm
135
Dimrā
138
Fasāil
201
FīqAfīq
206
Bibliography
242
Index
247
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xlii - Another fact not without interest is that great number of sacred sites lie in or near a ruin. It is not to be expected that one will always find remains of a large ruin; there may be only a few old rock-hewn tombs, remains of a few houses, several old cisterns, or some ancient pillars. Such a ruin ... existed long before the present shrine.
Page xlii - A ruin, an artificial cave, a solitary tree, or some old cisterns in a lonely deserted spot would stimulate the imagination ... About 32% of the sanctuaries which I visited were in the vicinity of some ruin.

About the author (2004)

Moshe Sharon, Ph.D., is Professor of Islamic History at The Hebrew University, Jerusalem. He studied epigraphy under Gaston Wiet, and has been collecting the material for CIAP since the last 1960s. He has published many books and articles on a variety of subjects on medieval Islam and Arabic epigraphy.