The Library Magazine, Volume 6 (Google eBook)

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J. B. Alden, 1880 - Choice literature
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Page 295 - Thy soul was like a star, and dwelt apart: Thou hadst a voice whose sound was like the sea: Pure as the naked heavens, majestic, free, So didst thou travel on life's common way, In cheerful godliness; and yet thy heart The lowliest duties on herself did lay.
Page 269 - ... the kingdoms of this world shall become the kingdom of our Lord, and of his Christ...
Page 278 - My hounds are bred out of the Spartan kind, So flewed, so sanded, and their heads are hung With ears that sweep away the morning dew ; Crook-kneed, and dewlapped like Thessalian bulls ; Slow in pursuit, but matched in mouth like bells, Each under each. A cry more tuneable Was never holla'd to, nor cheered with horn, In Crete, in Sparta, nor in Thessaly.
Page 64 - He's true to God who's true to man ; wherever wrong is done, To the humblest and the weakest, neath the allbeholding sun, That wrong is also done to us ; and they are slaves most base, Whose love of right is for themselves, and not for all their race.
Page 61 - O my life, have we not had seasons That only said, Live and rejoice? That asked not for causes and reasons, But made us all feeling and voice? When we went with the winds in their blowing, When Nature and we were peers, And we seemed to share in the flowing Of the inexhaustible years? Have we not from the earth drawn juices Too fine for earth's sordid uses? Have I heard, have I seen All I feel, all I know? Doth my heart overween? Or could it have been Long ago?
Page 316 - Beware of philosophy," is a precept not to be received in too large a sense : for, in this mass of nature, there is a set of things that carry in their front, though not in capital letters, yet in stenography and short characters, something of divinity ; which, to wiser reasons, serve as luminaries in the abyss of knowledge, and, to judicious beliefs, as scales and rundles to mount the pinnacles and highest pieces of divinity.
Page 173 - ... yet confess, that, to that end, reading the excellent Greek and Roman poets is of more use than making bad verses of his own, in a language that is not his own. And he, whose design it is to excel in English 'poetry, would not, I guess, think the way to it were to make his first essays in Latin verses.
Page 248 - So they rode till they came to a lake, the which was a fair water and broad, and in the midst of the lake Arthur was ware of an arm clothed in white samite, that held a fair sword in that hand. Lo, said Merlin, yonder is that sword that I spake of. With that they saw a damsel going upon the lake. What damsel is that? said Arthur. That is the Lady of the lake...
Page 292 - To every natural form, rock, fruit, or flower, Even the loose stones that cover the highway, I gave a moral life : I saw them feel, Or linked them to some feeling : the great mass Lay bedded in a quickening soul, and all That I beheld respired with inward meaning.
Page 260 - And thou wert the meekest man, and the gentlest, that ever ate in hall among ladies. And thou wert the sternest knight to thy mortal foe that ever put spear in the rest.

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