The Suppression of the African Slave-trade to the United States of America, 1638-1870 (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1904 - Antislavery movements - 335 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
7
III
16
IV
27
V
39
VI
53
VII
70
VIII
94
IX
131
X
151
XI
168
XII
194

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Page 225 - All men are born free and equal, and have certain natural, essential, and unalienable rights; among which may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending their lives and liberties; that of acquiring, possessing, and protecting property; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining their safety and happiness.
Page 202 - And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.
Page 189 - The importation of negroes of the African race, from any foreign country, other than the slaveholding States or Territories of the United States of America, is hereby forbidden, and Congress is required to pass such laws as shall effectually prevent the same.
Page 284 - States or Territories of the United States of America, is hereby forbidden; and Congress is required to pass such laws as shall effectually prevent the same. 2. Congress shall also have power to prohibit the introduction of slaves from any State not a member of, or Territory not belonging to, this Confederacy.
Page 253 - An Act to protect the commerce of the United States, and punish the crime of piracy...
Page 247 - Whereas the traffic in slaves is irreconcilable with the principles of humanity and justice, and whereas both His Majesty and the United States are desirous of continuing their efforts to promote its entire abolition, it is hereby agreed that both the contracting parties shall use their best endeavours to accomplish so desirable an object.
Page 337 - HARVARD HISTORICAL STUDIES: THE SUPPRESSION OF THE AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 1638-1870. By WEB Du Bois, Ph.D. 8vo. , 7*.
Page 258 - ... brought as a Slave or Slaves into any Island, Colony, Country, Territory, or Place whatsoever, or for the purpose of his, her, or their being sold, transferred, used, or dealt with as a Slave or Slaves, then and in every such Case the Person or Persons so offending 'shall be deemed and adjudged guilty of Piracy, Felony, and Robbery, and being convicted thereof shall suffer Death without Benefit of Clergy, and loss of lands, goods, and chattels, as Pirates, Felons, and Robbers upon the Seas ought...
Page 221 - The importation of slaves into the colonies from the coast of Africa hath long been considered as a trade of great inhumanity, and under its present encouragement, we have too much reason to fear will endanger the very existence of your Majesty's American dominions.
Page 221 - Colonies with more useful inhabitants, and may in time have the most destructive influence, we presume to hope that the interest of a few will be disregarded, when placed in competition with the security and happiness of such numbers of your Majesty's dutiful and loyal subjects. " ' Deeply impressed with these sentiments, we most humbly beseech your Majesty to remove all those restraints on your Majesty's Governors of this Colony which inhibit their assenting to such laws as might check so very pernicious...

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