The Statutes at Large;: Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature, in the Year 1619. : Published Pursuant to an Act of the General Assembly of Virginia, Passed on the Fifth Day of February One Thousand Eight Hundred and Eight. : Volume I[-XIII]. (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Editor, 1823 - Law
1 Review
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

First of all, it is a privilege to those of us far away from the originals, to have access to these primary sources, so important to the constitutional history of the United States, and thus I praise and thank Google for making it available on Googlebook.
This facsimile, unfortunately, is missing several inches at the bottom of the pages, which makes the document not very useful for research purposes.
While I greatly commend Google for the effort invested in the digitizing of the book, it seems to me that just a little verification of the process would have render a much better final result.
If complete, this is a fundamental book on the organic laws of the country.
 

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 43 - State should not raise men, or should raise a smaller number than its quota, and that any other State should raise a greater number of men than the quota thereof, such extra number shall be raised, officered, clothed, armed...
Page 40 - When land forces are raised by any state for the common defence, all officers of or under the rank of colonel shall be appointed by the legislature of each state respectively, by whom such forces shall be raised, or in such manner as such state shall direct; and all vacancies shall be filled up by the state which first made the appointment.
Page 25 - In all our deliberations on this subject, we kept steadily in our view that which appears to us the greatest interest of every true American the consolidation of our Union in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence.
Page 37 - The said states hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other for their common defence, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretence whatever.
Page 23 - Convention, that it should afterwards be submitted to a Convention of Delegates, chosen in each State, by the people thereof; under the recommendation of its legislature, for their assent and ratification...
Page 41 - ... sole and exclusive right and power of determining on peace and war, except in the cases mentioned in the sixth Article, of sending and receiving ambassadors; entering into treaties and alliances, provided that no treaty of commerce shall be made, whereby the legislative power of the respective States shall be restrained from imposing such imposts and duties on foreigners, as their own people are subjected to, or from prohibiting the exportation or importation of any species of goods or commodities...
Page 25 - That it will meet the full and entire approbation of every state is not perhaps to be expected; but each will doubtless consider, that had her interest been alone consulted, the consequences might have been particularly disagreeable or injurious to others; that it is liable to as few exceptions as could reasonably have been expected, we hope and believe; that it may promote the lasting welfare of that country so dear to us all, and secure her freedom and happiness, is our most ardent wish.
Page 41 - ... to appoint, by joint consent, commissioners or judges to constitute a court for hearing and determining the matter in question...
Page 42 - ... the persons whose names shall be so drawn, or any five of them, shall be commissioners or judges, to hear and finally determine the controversy, so always as a major part of the judges, who shall hear the cause, shall agree in the determination...
Page 45 - The committee of the states, or any nine of them, shall be authorized to execute, in the recess of Congress, such of the powers of Congress as the United States, in Congress assembled, by the consent of nine states shall, from time to time, think expedient to vest them with...

Bibliographic information