Steam pumps: a collection of catalogues (Google eBook)

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Page 222 - To find the pressure in pounds per square inch of a column of water, multiply the height of the column in feet by .434. Approximately, we say that every foot elevation is equal to % pound pressure per square inch ; this allows for ordinary friction. To find the diameter of a pump cylinder...
Page 121 - A margin must be made between the power and the resistance to move the pistons at the required speed say from 20 to 40 per cent, according to speed and other conditions. To find the capacity of a cylinder in gallons: Multiplying the area in inches by the length of stroke in inches will give the total number of cubic inches ; divide this amount by 231 (which is the cubical contents of a gallon of water) and quotient is the capacity in gallons.
Page 118 - When the chest piston has traveled a certain distance, a port on the opposite end is uncovered and steam there enters, stopping its further travel by giving it the necessary cushion. In other words, when the rotative motion is given to the auxiliary or...
Page 120 - ... value of the same weight of different woods is very nearly the same; that is, a pound of hickory is worth no more for fuel than a pound of pine, assuming both to be dry.
Page 222 - The mean pressure of the atmosphere is usually estimated at 14.7 Ibs. per square inch, so that with a perfect vacuum it will sustain a column of mercury 29.9 inches or a column of water 33.9 feet high. To find the pressure in pounds per square inch of a column of water.
Page 5 - ... travel by giving it the necessary cushion. In other words, when the rotative motion is given to the auxiliary or valve-driving piston by the mechanism outside, it opens the port to steam admission on one end, and at the same time opens the port on the other end to the exhaust.
Page 222 - To find the horse power necessary to elevate water to a given height, multiply the weight of the water elevated per minute in...
Page 121 - The area of the steam piston multiplied by the steam pressure, gives the total amount of pressure exerted. The area of the water piston, multiplied by the pressure of water per square inch, gives the resistance. A margin must be made between the power and the resistance, to move the pistons at the required speed; usually reckoned at about 50 per cent.
Page 222 - To find the diameter of a pump cylinder to move a given quantity of water per minute (100 feet of piston being the standard of speed), divide the number of gallons by 4 then extract the square root, and the product will be the diameter in inches of the pump cylinder. To find quantity of water elevated in one minute...
Page 222 - Doubling the diameter of a pipe increases its capacity four times. Friction of liquids in pipes increases as the square of the velocity. The mean pressure of the atmosphere is usually estimated at 14.7 pounds per square inch...