A Modern History of New London County, Connecticut, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Benjamin Tinkham Marshall
Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1922 - New London County (Conn.)
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 23 - Room called to know the matter Little miss said shee was making a bed for the men; who, when they were in Bed, complained their leggs lay out of it by reason of its shortness my poor bones complained bitterly not being used to such Lodgings, and so did the man who was with us; and poor I made but one Grone, which was from the time I went to bed to the time I Riss, which was about three in the morning, Setting up by the Fire till Light...
Page 33 - The fund, called the School Fund, shall remain a perpetual fund, the interest of which shall be inviolably appropriated to the support and encouragement of the public or common schools throughout the State, and for the equal benefit of all the people thereof.
Page 91 - In their bloom, And the names he loved to hear Have been carved for many a year On the tomb.
Page 16 - Chest by the bed side, and setting up, fell to my old way of composing my Resentments, in the following manner: I ask thy Aid, O Potent Rum! To Charm these wrangling Topers Dum. Thou hast their Giddy Brains possest-- The man confounded with the Beast- And I, poor I, can get no rest. Intoxicate them with thy fumes: O still their Tongues till morning comes! And I know not but my wishes took effect; for the dispute soon ended with 'tother Dram; and so Good night!
Page 14 - I tho't was boil'd in her dye Kettle ; the bread was Indian, and every thing on the Table service Agreeable to these. I, being hungry, gott a little down ; but my stomach was soon cloy'd and what cabbage I swallowed serv'd me for a Cudd the whole day after.
Page 14 - I told her shee treated me very Rudely, and I did not think it my duty to answer her unmannerly Questions. But to get ridd of them, I told her I come there to have the post's company with me to-morrow on my Journey, &c.
Page 366 - ... the smallpox was always present, filling the churchyards with corpses, tormenting with constant fears all whom it had not yet stricken, leaving on those whose lives it spared the hideous traces of its power, turning the babe into a changeling at which the mother shuddered, and making the eyes and cheeks of the betrothed maiden objects of horror to the lover.
Page 17 - Oyle to fire, encreased the flame. I set my Candle on a Chest by the bed side, and setting up, fell to my old way of composing my Resentments, in the following manner: I ask thy Aid, O Potent Rum! To Charm these wrangling Topers Dum. Thou hast their Giddy Brains possest The man confounded wth the Beast And I, poor I, can get no rest. Intoxicate them with thy fumes: O still their Tongues till morning comes!
Page 24 - The Cittie of New York is a pleasant, well compacted place, situated on a Commodius River wch is a fine harbour for shipping. The Buildings Brick Generaly, very stately and high, though not altogether like ours in Boston. The Bricks in some of the Houses are of divers Coullers and laid in Checkers, being glazed look very agreeable. The inside of them are neat to admiration...
Page 265 - We are always in these days endeavouring to separate the two; we want one man to be always thinking, and another to be always working, and we call one a gentleman, and the other an operative ; whereas the workman ought often to be thinking, and the thinker often to be working, and both should be gentlemen, in the best sense.

Bibliographic information