Walking On Water: A Life In The Law

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Random House Australia, Apr 1, 2011 - Biography & Autobiography - 330 pages
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Reflections and rumblings on human nature and the law from one of Australia's longest serving criminal defence barristers, once nicknamed 'The Smiling Funnelweb', Chester Porter QC.Chester Porter's life in the law began in 1948, when at the age of 21 he was the youngest lawyer to be admitted to the Bar. He took silk in 1974 and quickly became known as Sydney's best defence lawyer, shunning the courtroom theatricals favoured by many of his rivals.'Young Chester' was the man others would go to if they were in strife. Chester's most famous cases included successfully defending the 'once only's' such as Detective Sgt Roger Rogerson on bribery charges, and Judge John Foord who was accused of attempting to pervert the course of justice. He was counsel assisting the Northern Territory Commissions of Inquiry into the convictions of Lindy and Michael Chamberlain. After clocking up scores of legendary victories, some of Macquarie Street's more larrikin lawyers produced a limited edition t- shirt with 'Chester Porter Walks on Water'- a slogan that sums up an illustrious career that spanned more than 50 years. This is not merely a reflection of human nature at its worst but also an overview of how the law has changed and developed over the years. From the McDermott Royal Commission to the reform of forensic evidence and the future of the law in Australia, this is the long-awaited memoir from one of Australia's most respected QC's.

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Review: Walking on Water: A Life in the Law

User Review  - Ralph - Goodreads

Chester Porter's life is a living history of jurisprudence in Australia. In this very readable, often moving, occasionally humorous memoir of his life as a barrister, first as a struggling Junior ... Read full review

About the author (2011)

Chester Porter retired from the Bar on 30 June, 2000. The Bar Council of NSW made him an Honorary Life Member in August 2000 for his exceptional service to the Bar and the profession of law. As barrister Peter Clyne once commented: "I had the doubtful pleasure of being cross examined by Chester. That experience is rather like having your throat cut, quietly, courteously and swiftly"

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