The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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F. C. and J. Rivington; T. Egerton; J. Cuthell; Scatcherd and Letterman; Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown; Cadell and Davies, 1821
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Page 391 - And hang their heads with sorrow : good grows with her In her days every man shall eat in safety Under his own vine what he plants, and sing The merry songs of peace to all his neighbours. God shall be truly known ; and those about her From her shall read the perfect ways of honour, And by those claim their greatness, not by blood.
Page 419 - Upon the sightless couriers of the air, Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall drown the wind. I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself And falls on the other.
Page 297 - Under the opening eyelids of the morn, We drove a-field, and both together heard What time the gray-fly winds her sultry horn, Battening our flocks with the fresh dews of night, Oft till the star that rose at evening, bright, Toward heaven's descent had sloped his westering wheel.
Page 662 - His mind and hand went together ; and what he thought, he uttered with that easiness, that we have scarce received from him a blot in his papers.
Page 349 - Romeo: and when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.
Page 601 - In the name of God, Amen. I William Shakspeare of Stratford-upon Avon, in the county of Warwick, gent. in perfect health and memory, (God be praised !) do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following : that is to say : First, I commend my soul into the hands of God my creator, hoping, and assuredly believing, through the only merits of Jesus Christ my Saviour, to be made partaker of life everlasting; and my body to the earth whereof it is made.
Page 286 - Will in that station, was the faint, general, and almost lost ideas, he had of having once seen him act a part in one of his own comedies, wherein being to personate a decrepit old man, he wore a long beard, and appeared so weak and drooping, and unable to walk, that he was forced to be supported and carried by another person to a table, at which he was seated among some company who were eating, and one of them sung a song.
Page 662 - Bookes depends upon your capacities : and not of your heads alone, but of your purses. Well! It is now publique, & you wil stand for your priviledges wee know: to read and censure.
Page 304 - ... supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you; and being an absolute Johannes factotum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country.
Page 291 - Tis miracle to see a first good play ; All hawthorns do not bloom on Christmas-day. A slender poet must have time to grow, And spread and burnish as his brothers do. Who still looks lean, sure with some mark is cursed ; But no man can be Falstaff-fat at first.

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