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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me, Without my stir. Ban. New....  Take our survey New!
" If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me, Without my stir. Ban. New honours come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest... "
A Few Notes on Shakespeare - Page 119
by Alexander Dyce - 1853 - 156 pages
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Macbeth. King John

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens, John Bell - 1788
...honours come upon him Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Mac. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Mac. Mac. Give me your favour : — my dull brain was...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare, George Steevens, Nicholas Rowe, Samuel Johnson - 1803
...honours come upon him Like our strange garments; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Mac. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Mac. Give me your favour: — my dull brain was wrought...
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Letters from Paraguay : Describing the Settlements of Montevideo An[d ...

John Constanse Davie - Argentina - 1805 - 293 pages
...dropped by the Indian with whom I have spoken seem to indicate as much: but, in the words of Macbeth — Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day." On my return to Rioja Minor ,1 expect to find there a letter, with a remittance from don Manuel ; and...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the corrected copy ...

William Shakespeare - 1805
...come upon him Like our strange garments; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.1 Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour:8 — my dull brain...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare : Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1805
...come upon him Like our strange garments; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.4 Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour:6 — my dull brain...
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The plays of William Shakespeare ...: With the corrections and ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare, Joseph Dennie, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1806
...come upon him Like our strange garments; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Mach. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. 1 Is smother'd in surmise ; and nothing is,. But lo&at is not.] All powers of action are oppressed...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With Notes of Various Commentators, Volume 6

William Shakespeare, Manley Wood - 1806
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour: — my dull brain was wrought...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, with the corrections and illustr. of ...

William Shakespeare - 1806
...come upon him Like our strange garments ; cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Mach. Come what come may ; Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.1 9 function It tmother'd in rurmite ; and nothing iV,. But vihat it not .] All powers of action...
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King Lear: A Tragedy in Five Acts, Volume 4

William Shakespeare, Nahum Tate, Mrs. Inchbald - Aging parents - 1808 - 78 pages
...come upon him, Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. .Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour : — my dull brain was...
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The British Theatre; Or, A Collection of Plays: Which are Acted at the ...

Mrs. Inchbald - English drama - 1808
...come upon him, Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use. Macb. Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day. Ban. Worthy Macbeth, we stay upon your leisure. Macb. Give me your favour:—my dull brain was wrought...
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