The Brothers and Sisters Learn to Write: Popular Literacies in Childhood and School Cultures

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Teachers College Press, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 256 pages
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Building on her groundbreaking work in Writing Superheroes, Anne Dyson traces the influence of a wide-ranging set of "textual toys" from children's lives:church and hip-hop songs, rap music, movies, TV, traditional jump-rope rhymes, the words of professional sports announcers and radio deejays, upon school learning and writing. Wonderfully rich portraits of five African American first-graders demonstrate how children's imaginative use of wider cultural symbols enriches their school learning. Featuring lively and engaging vignettes of children who are often left behind by our educational system, this book shows that children bring a rich folk culture to school and demonstrates how they "remix" their cultural references to accommodate school tasks like writing, and provides concrete examples of how children's cultural literacy practices translate into classroom practices and, in turn, into practices of academic success.
  

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Contents

Mapping the Cultural Landscape of a Contemporary Childhood
28
Marcel and the Textual Mediation
78
Noahs Textual Ark
109
Denises Musical Voices
137
A Writing Development Remix
169
Youve Got to Grow
192
Opening Up Childrens Worlds
207
Conventions Used in Transcripts
217
Glossary
223
Media Bibliography
239
Index
245
About the Author
256
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Dyson is Professor of Education in Language and Literacy in the Graduate School of Education, University of California-Berkeley.

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