Suggestions for the improvement of our towns and houses (Google eBook)

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1843
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Page 175 - House, to any person or persons who shall sue for the same in any of his Majesty's courts at Westminster ; and the money so forfeited shall be recovered by the person or persons so suing, with full...
Page 175 - Back, and With or Partition of any Chimney or Flue, hereafter to be built or rebuilt, shall be built of sound Materials, and the Joints of the Work well filled in with good Mortar or Cement, and rendered or stuccoed within ; and also that every Chimney or Flue hereafter to be built or rebuilt in any Wall, or of greater Length than Four Feet out of any Wall, not being a circular Chimney or Flue of Twelve Inches in Diameter, shall be in every Section of the same not less than Fourteen Inches by Nine...
Page 4 - ... for a time only, into the hands of public trustees or commissioners, till they might be dispensed to them again, with more advantage to themselves than otherwise was possible to be effected.
Page 4 - The only, and as it happened insurmountable, difficulty remaining, was the obstinate aversencss of great part of the citizens to alter their old properties, and to recede from building their houses again on the old ground and foundations; as also the distrust in many, and unwillingness...
Page 4 - ... the obstinate averseness of great part of the citizens to alter their old properties and to recede from building their houses on the old ground and foundations; as also the distrust in many and unwillingness to give up their properties, though for a time only, into the hands of public trustees or commissioners till they might be dispensed to them again with more advantage to themselves than was otherwise possible to be effected...
Page 3 - ... and carrying them as near parallel to one another as might be; avoiding, if compatible with greater conveniences, all acute angles; by seating all the parochial churches conspicuous and insular; by forming the most public places into large piazzas, the centre of six or eight ways; by uniting the halls of the twelve chief companies into one regular square annexed to Guildhall; by making a quay on the whole bank of the river, from Blackfriars to the Tower...
Page 158 - He raised himself up, and, leaning upon his spade, replied ' Some one planted trees before I was born, and I have eaten the fruit; I now plant for others, that the memorial of my gratitude may exist when I am dead and gone.
Page 3 - Wren, pursuant to the royal command, immediately after the fire, took an exact survey of the whole area and confines of the burning, having traced over with great trouble and hazard the great plain of ashes and ruins...
Page 175 - Four Inches at the least, upon pain of Forfeiture, by every Master Builder or other Master Workman who shall make or cause to be made such Chimney or Flue, of...
Page 163 - ... not adopted, the moisture in the foundations in wet weather, will induce the inclined parts to descend, to the manifest danger of fracturing the walls and destroying the building. In walling, in dry weather, when the work is required to be firm, the best mortar must be used ; and the bricks must be wetted, or dipped in water, as they are laid, to cause them to adhere to the mortar, which they would not do if laid dry ; for the dry sandy nature of the brick absorbs the moisture of the mortar and...

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