Emma Goldman: Made for America, 1890-1901

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Emma Goldman, Candace Falk, Barry Pateman, Jessica M. Moran
University of California Press, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 655 pages
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Emma Goldman: A Documentary History of the American Years redefines the historical memory of Emma Goldman and illuminates a forgotten yet influential facet of the history of American and European radicalism. This definitive multivolume work, which differs significantly from Goldman’s autobiography, presents original texts—a significant group of which are published in or translated into English for the first time—anchored by rigorous contextual annotations. The distillation of years of scholarly research, these volumes include personal correspondence, newspaper articles, government surveillance reports from America and Europe, dramatic court transcripts, unpublished lecture notes, and an array of other rare items and documentation. Biographical, newspaper, and organizational appendixes are complemented by in-depth chronologies that underscore the complexity of Goldman’s political and social milieu.

The first volume, Made for America, 1890–1901, tracks the young Emma Goldman’s introduction into the anarchist movement, features her earliest known writings in the German anarchist press, and charts her gradual emergence from the radical immigrant circles of New York City’s Lower East Side into a political and intellectual culture of both national and international importance. Goldman’s remarkable public ascendance is framed within a volatile period of political violence: within the first few pages, Henry Clay Frick, the anti-union industrialist, is shot by Alexander Berkman, Goldman’s lover; the book ends with the assassination of President William McKinley, an act in which Goldman was falsely implicated. The documents surrounding these events shed light on difficult issues—and spark an important though chilling debate about Goldman’s strategy for reconciling her "beautiful vision" of anarchism and the harsh realities of her times.

The documents articulate the force of Goldman’s rage, tracing the development of her political and social critique as well as her originality and her remarkable ability to synthesize and popularize cutting-edge political and cultural ideas. Goldman appears as a rising luminary in the mainstream press—a voice against hypocrisy and a lightning rod of curiosity, intrigue, and sometimes fear. The volumes include newspaper accounts of the speaking tours across America that eventually established her reputation as one of the most challenging and passionate orators of the twentieth century.

Themes that came to dominate Goldman’s life—anarchism and its possibilities, free speech, education, the transformative power and social significance of literature, the position of labor within the capitalist economic system, the vital importance of women’s freedom, the dynamics of personal relationships, and strategies for a social revolution—are among the many introduced in Made for America.
  

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Emma Goldman: a documentary history of the American year

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This first volume of a new collection of writings by and about anarchist leader Goldman covers her formative period, when she was emerging as a political agitator. Many of the documents included ... Read full review

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This review comes from Stephen Hupp in May 2003's LIBRARY JOURNAL.
This first volume of a new collection of writings by and about anarchist leader Goldman covers her formative period, when she was
emerging as a political agitator. Many of the documents included here were selected from the microfilm edition of the Emma Goldman Papers, with others discovered since its publication included as well. The materials fall into three broad categories: published articles, personal correspondences, and government documents. Most of the articles first appeared in the radical and popular press and present Goldman's early views on politics, the use of violence to effect change, free speech, marriage, and other topics. The letters include those from Goldman's lover Alexander Berkman, written while he was in prison for attempting to assassinate Henry Clay Frick in 1892. Finally, the government documents include excerpts from Goldman's 1893 trial for unlawful assembly in New York plus Prussian and French police and intelligence service reports on her activities, including the 1901 extradition order removing her from France. The book also includes a chronology and directories of the people, periodicals, and organizations covered in the documents. Materials originally written in German are presented in both German and English. This collection is an excellent overview of Goldman's early years and is recommended for larger public and all academic libraries 

Contents

1890
3
October
23
Editorial Practices
85
An Eloquent Woman
95
Johann Most 1890
97
Alexander Berkman 1890
101
Handwritten note from Alexander Berkman to Henry Clay Frick 23 July 1892
104
Police photo of Alexander Berkman 1892
105
Series in Sturmvogel letters I and III in German
293
Letters from a Tour
300
Masthead of Sturmvogel 1897
301
American PostBag
318
Cover of Le Pere Peinard almanac 1897
319
Masthead of Free Society 1902
323
What Emma Says
324
Emma Goldman Anarchist
331

Drawing of Emma Goldman in New York World 1892
112
Anarchys Den
116
Masthead of Der Anarchist 1893
120
Appeal in Der Anarchist in German
122
October From Alexander Berkman
129
From Alexander Berkman
136
Carl Nold ca 1890s
139
Badly Advised
144
The Right of Free Speech in America
151
Cover of Die Brandfackel 1893
152
Nellie Bly 1890
156
The People vs Emma Goldman
161
Cover sheet of trial transcript 1893
163
Police photo of Emma Goldman 1893
164
Philadelphia police arrest record slip for Emma Goldman 1893
165
The Laws Limit
177
November Essay in Die Brandfackel in German
183
Advertisement in Die Brandfackel 1893
187
Voltairine de Cleyre 1891
195
Cover of de Cleyres 1894 pamphlet In Defense of Emma Goldmann
196
August 20
203
Sketches of anarchists in New York World 1894
204
Cover of Liberty 1895
222
Louise Michel ca 1890s
226
Cover of The Rebel 1895
229
1896
233
John Turner ca 1900
237
Masthead of The Firebrand 1897
238
Goldmans Cry Against Society
247
Handwritten page of 2 December 1896 letter from Emma Goldman to Max Metzkow
252
Headline from Pittsburg Post story on Emma Goldman 1896
258
To Max Metzkow
260
Anarchy in Spain and in New York
274
Advised Strenuous Measures
285
Sketches of Emma Goldman and her audience in Boston Daily Globe 1897
286
Front page of St Louis PostDispatch interview of Emma Goldman 24 October 1897
290
A Short Account of My Late Tour
337
Gives Her Side
344
Masthead of Liberty 1899
350
Benjamin Tucker ca 1887
351
Authority vs Liberty
353
Handbill for London mass meeting commemorating Haymarket anarchists 1899
358
An Anarchist Propagandist
362
Handbill for Emma Goldmans series of lectures at Athenaeum Hall London 1899
363
Advertisement in Arbeter Fraint for Emma Goldman lecture in Yiddish 1899
367
To Augustin Hamon
370
Program for London mass meeting benefiting Italian anarchists 1899
371
Max Nettlau ca 1890s
375
To Max Nettlau in German
377
The Effect of War on the Workers
384
Program for London farewell concert honoring Emma Goldman 1900
390
The Propaganda
392
Peter Kropotkin ca 1890s
396
Some More Observations
400
To Max Nettlau in German
404
Rented by Emma Goldman
422
ca March 24 From Peter Kropotkin
438
Defends Acts of Bomb Throwers
452
Photo of Emma Goldman with drawing in Chicago Tribune 1901
461
Front page of San Francisco Call 1901
465
The Tragedy at Buffalo
471
Police photo of Emma Goldman 1901
473
Police report of Emma Goldmans arrest 1901
474
Front page of New York World 1901
480
From Alexander Berkman
484
Chronology
489
Directories
516
Selected Bibliography
581
Acknowledgments
597
Index
615
Copyright

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Page 583 - Guilty" was repeated in each of the five cases, and the prisoners were asked by the presiding judge if they had anything to say why sentence should not be passed on them.

About the author (2003)

One of the towering figures in global radicalism of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, EMMA GOLDMAN (1869-1940) was an anarchist, a feminist, a pacifist, a communist, a unionist, and a proponent of birth control and free love. Her extreme notions made her as much an object of outrage as one of reverence in the tumultuous years of the Gilded Age, World War I, and the Roaring Twenties, and her name remains, to this day, synonymous with ideas of sweeping cultural revolution. Here, in her two-volume memories, first published in 1931, she tells her life story. From her arrival in New York as a 20-year-old seamstress, when she immediately launched into a life of activism and public agitation, she recalls her childhood in Lithuania, her immigration to the U.S. as a teenager, and her wild adventures as an independent and intelligent woman: baptizing babies on a beer barrel, supporting workingmen's strikes, traveling in Europe... An important and influential figure in such far-flung geopolitical events as the Russian Revolution and the Spanish Civil War, Goldman is one of the most storied people of the 20th century. And her story, in her own inimitable words, is one of the great biographies, and one of the great personal histories of a turbulent era.

Candace Falk is a Guggenheim Fellow and the founding director of the Emma Goldman Papers research project at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of "New York Times" Notable Biography of the Year "Love, Anarchy, and Emma Goldman." Barry Pateman is the associate editor of the Emma Goldman Papers, curator of the Kate Sharpley Library, and editor of "Chomsky on Anarchism," Jessica Moran is a former assistant editor of the Emma Goldman Papers and is an archivist and scholar of anarchist history.