Loud Hawk: The United States Versus the American Indian Movement

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University of Oklahoma Press, 2002 - History - 373 pages
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Loud Hawk: The United States versus the American Indian Movement is the story of a criminal case that began with the arrest of six members of the American Indian Movement in Portland, Oregon, in 1975. The case did not end until 1988, after thirteen years of pretrial litigaion. It stands as the longest pretrial case in U.S. history.

This is a dramatic story of people and of government abuse of the legal system, of judicial courage and bone-chilling bigotry. It is an insiderís view of the legal process and of the conditions in Indian country that led up to and followed Wounded Knee.

  

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Loud Hawk: the United States versus the American Indian Movement

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The author, now with the American Jewish Committee, was involved with the criminal case United States v. Loud Hawk , first as a student volunteer for the defense attorneys and later as lead counsel ... Read full review

Contents

Milepost 371
3
Mighty Midgets
7
Bomber Bill
14
Rank and Serial Number
23
OffenseDefense
30
Nits Make Lice
40
Iron Door Woman
49
Prejudice and Informants
56
The Dismissal
161
Wounded Knee
172
A Burning Bush
182
A New Role
196
Vindictive Prosecution
206
Away from South Dakota
219
Camps
231
The Supreme Court
246

Rekindling the Dream
71
A Bullet in a Guys Head
81
A Familiar Signature
93
Dynamite
99
Theyll Stop Bullets
116
Justice South Dakota Style
121
All My Relations
135
Percent Proof
149
Heading for a Jury
260
Investigating Indian Country
275
Capturing the War
302
Justification and Richard Nixon
317
Terror Times
334
Epilogue
351
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Kenneth S. Stern's Loud Hawk won the 1995 Gustavus Myers Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Stidy of Human Rights in North America. Kenneth S. Stern is also the author of A Force upon the Plain; The American Militia Movement and the Politics of Hate and Holocaust Denial.

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