Jane Goodall: 40 years at Gombe : a tribute to four decades of wildlife research, education, and conservation

Front Cover
Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 1999 - Biography & Autobiography - 128 pages
4 Reviews
On the occasion of Goodall's 40th anniversary of groundbreaking research with the chimpanzees of Gombe, this beautifully illustrated volume traces her work from its singular beginnings to the Jane Goodall Institute's present-day international activities. 65 full-color and 30 duotone photos.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Jane Goodall: 40 Years at Gombe

User Review  - Kelseyleigh Reber - Goodreads

Read in one sitting! Great for anyone interested in women's efforts in the biological sciences and/or primate behavior. It accounts Goodall's work in Gombe, including accounts of both her research ... Read full review

Review: Jane Goodall: 40 Years at Gombe

User Review  - Mallory - Goodreads

I read it this morning, it's an incredibly fast read because of the amount of pictures (fantastic, by the way.) This short book goes into Goodall's research with the chimpanzees, her work creating ... Read full review

Contents

Foreword tJr lbe r M GrOsve nOr
8
Tke BeiHHiW
16
Tkfi CkiwtpHees
28
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

Jane Goodall, 1934 - Jane Goodall, a well-respected English zoologist, is famous for her fieldwork with chimpanzees in Africa. An early interest in African wild animals and the opportunity, at age 18, to stay on a friend's farm in Kenya, led her to Dr. Louis Leakey; then curator of the National Museum of Natural History in Nairobi. Almost immediately Leakey hired Goodall as his assistant secretary, and she was soon accompanying Leakey and his wife on their expeditions. Following Leakey's suggestion that a field study of some of the higher primates would be a major contribution to the understanding of animal behavior, she began studying the chimpanzees of the Gombe Stream Research Center in Tanganyika (now Tanzania) in 1960. Although she had no undergraduate degree, Goodall earned a Ph.D. from Cambridge University in 1965, based on her first five years of research at the Gombe Center. After more than 20 years of extensive study and direct contact with wild chimpanzees in their natural habitat, Goodall continues to research, teach, and write about primate behavior today.

Bibliographic information