Introduction to Marine Biology

Front Cover
Cengage Learning, Jan 7, 2009 - Science - 592 pages
1 Review
INTRODUCTION TO MARINE BIOLOGY third edition distinguishes itself at the introductory text level by offering comprehensive treatment and thorough integration of Ecology in the study of marine biology. Chapter two, Fundamentals of Ecology, presents human impact on the marine environment and this theme is integrated throughout the text allowing for dynamic class discussions of marine life and environmental change. Written expressly for non-science students, INTRODUCTION TO MARINE BIOLOGY third edition is crafted to spark curiosity about the marine world as well as provide an understanding of the process of science which is presented in Chapter one and revisited in unique boxed readings through out the text. Additionally, the pedagogy was developed expressly for these students to help draw them into and better understand the content. The new, open look and feel of INTRODUCTION TO MARINE BIOLOGY third edition and the enhanced art program convey the beauty and awe of life in the ocean. Twenty spectacular photos now open each chapter, piquing the motivation and attention of students and over 150 photos and pieces of art are new or redesigned.
Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This is a very good compilation written in a lucid manner and covers all the important topics and it is useful for teachers and students.

Contents

Science and Marine Biology
1
Fundamentals of Ecology
15
Geology of the Ocean
45
Water Waves and Tides
69
Biological Concepts
99
Marine Microbes
125
Multicellular Primary Producers
159
Lower Invertebrates
191
Intertidal Communities
357
Estuaries
387
Coral Reef Communities
413
Continental Shelves and Neritic Zone
443
The Open Sea
463
Life in the Oceans Depths
487
Harvesting the Oceans Resources
507
Oceans in Jeopardy
533

Higher Invertebrates
219
Marine Fishes
263
Marine Reptiles and Birds
297
Marine Mammals
325
Glossary
556
Answers to MultipleChoice Questions
573
Index
574
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

George Karleskint started teaching in 1972 and has been at St. Louis Community College, Meramec, since 1976. Karleskint enjoys teaching because it gives him the opportunity to help students understand the wonders of life and the special, and even somewhat mysterious, biological world in which they live. In 1994 he was given the outstanding teacher award by the Xi Lambda chapter of Phi Theta Kappa. George first became interested in marine biology as a child, on trips to Florida when he wanted to know more about the shells he collected. By the time he was in college he had learned so much about molluscs and taxonomy that he was something of a local expert on the topic. His varied college and graduate school interests (first chemistry, then biology, then invertebrate zoology) culminated in his current specialty of physiology. His family shares his love of travel, the ocean, and marine creatures.

Dr. Richard Turner joined the faculty of Florida Tech in 1976. His postdoctoral studies were done at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution (1982-1983). He has served as president of the Florida Academy of Sciences (1985-1986, 2009-2011) and is business manager (1994 to present) of the Florida Scientist, the journal of the Florida Academy of Sciences. He has 34 publications in refereed journals and books. Dr. Turner's research has been focused on the general biology of echinoderms, a group of marine animals that include seastars, sea urchins, and brittlestars. Other research projects include general biology of the Florida applesnail, fossilization of the Atlantic ghost crab, and the role of beachhoppers in processing of beach wrack and in transport of marine mites.

James W. Small, Jr., is Professor of Biology at Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida where he has taught for 36 years. He also serves as the College's Chief Pre-Health Professions Advisor. He obtained the Bachelor of Science degree in zoology at the University of North Carolina and received his M.S. degree in zoology and Ph.D degree in Biological Sciences from the University of Kentucky (1972). His dissertation was on the bioenergetics of stream fishes, but he has also done extensive work on the ecology of the Central Florida lakes for many years, involving many students in his ecological studies. Professor Small began team teaching marine biology in 1976, with on campus lectures and laboratory experiences on the Florida coasts, the Florida Keys, Barbados, and Hawaii. The Barbados and Hawaii laboratories have been offered on a two year rotation and involve taking students to professional marine biology laboratories (McGill University in Barbados or the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology in Hawaii) for 14-21 days where they collect organisms and study various marine ecosystems. Particular emphasis is given to the study of mangroves, coral reefs, and the rocky intertidal communities. He has also taught a course for college teachers on tropical intertidal biology (in Barbados) and has authored publications on fish systematics, ecology, and teaching.

Bibliographic information