Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 21 (Google eBook)

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Blackwood., 1827
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Page 513 - The Lord, ye know, is God indeed, Without our aid He did us make: We are His flock, He doth us feed And for his sheep He doth us take.
Page 392 - THE stately homes of England, How beautiful they stand, Amidst their tall ancestral trees, O'er all the pleasant land ! The deer across their greensward bound Through shade and sunny gleam, And the swan glides past them with the sound Of some rejoicing stream.
Page 415 - I AM the resurrection and the life, saith the Lord: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth and believeth in me, shall never die.
Page 406 - A man must serve his time to every trade Save censure critics all are ready made.
Page 392 - What gladsome looks of household love Meet in the ruddy light! There woman's voice flows forth in song, Or childhood's tale is told, Or lips move tunefully along Some glorious page of old.
Page 200 - People begin to see that something more goes to the composition of a fine murder than two blockheads to kill and be killed a knife a purse and a dark lane. Design, gentlemen, grouping, light and shade, poetry, sentiment, are now deemed indispensable to attempts of this nature.
Page 392 - Through glowing orchards forth they peep, Each from its nook of leaves, And fearless there the lowly sleep, As the bird beneath their eaves. The free fair homes of England, Long, long, in hut and hall, May hearts of native proof be reared To guard each hallowed wall. And green for ever be the groves, And bright the flowery sod, Where first the child's glad spirit loves Its country and its God.
Page 406 - Tis pleasant, sure, to see one's name in print; A book's a book, although there's nothing in't.
Page 240 - I have waited with the greatest anxiety until the committee appointed by the house of commons to inquire into my conduct, as commander-in-chief of his majesty's army, had closed its examinations, and I now hope that it will not be deemed improper to address this letter, through you, to the house of commons. I...
Page 201 - Enough has been given to morality; now comes the turn of Taste and the Fine Arts. A sad thing it was, no doubt, very sad; but we can't mend it. Therefore let us make the best of a bad matter; and, as it is impossible to hammer anything out of it for moral purposes, let us treat it aesthetically, and see if it will turn to account in that way. Such is the logic of a sensible man; and what follows? We dry up our tears, and have the satisfaction perhaps, to discover that a transaction which, morally...

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