Passion And Social Constraint (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Transaction Publishers, 1963 - Philosophy - 368 pages
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In intellectual and academic circles, Ernest van den Haag is respected for his brilliant mind, his outspoken and often highly controversial assertions, and a very unacademic, sharp, biting style.

Passion and Social Constraint, before its adaptation into a book for the general reader, was part of an enormous textbook, which Dr. van den Haag wrote with Professor Ralph Ross called The Fabric of Society. It received an (unprecedented) rave review in the New Yorker: "this book is everything a text book should not be--cynical, witty, up-to-date, and shamelessly opinionated Altogether a rare treat." It attracted the attention of the experts in psychology and sociology and the devotion of students and will now have enormous appeal to the layman who wants insight into who he is: sexually, psychologically, and individually.

In Passion and Social Constraint, Ernest van den Haag is deeply concerned with the necessity and difficulty of being an individual in a society which tends more and more to standardize every facet of life. Be deals with anxiety; sex, and the problem of-who is normal; the status of women; the authority of parents; the family as an industry in present-day America conflict and power, and who gets what; the "furnished souls" of popular culture; arid why it is that science cannot give us a measure for happiness or for despair. Van den Haag' s style will delight you (some of his phrases are destined for Bartlett), though his judgments will, sometimes stir you to anger.

Ernest van den Haag taught at New York University and the New School for Social Research, and the New York Law School, he was also a practicing psychoanalyst. He was born in The Hague and was educated In France, Germany, Italy, Iowa, and New York. He was an associate of the National Review for forty-five years.

Ralph Ross, his collaborator on the original The Fabric of Society, was professor of philosophy and chairman of the Humanities Program at the University of Minnesota.

  

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Contents

economic progress and social wellbeing
189
fluidity and heterogeneity
192
science and scientism Ersatz religion
195
Class Estate and Caste
200
possibilities of change
202
stratification and life changes
203
castes estates classes
205
Expansion Mobility and the Class System
210

the Oedipus complex in individuals
28
social effects of the Oedipus complex
34
Who Is Normal?
40
health normality and morality
43
sane and insane societies?
47
the defenses of the Ego
51
the unconscious
52
Sex Repression and Beyond
54
general effects
56
two types of neuroses
58
psychoses
60
psychopaths
61
infantile and later experiences
62
interpersonal and cultural factors
63
is sex necessary?
64
moral responsibility
65
O the pain the bliss of dying
66
Treatment
69
psychosomatic symptoms
75
some tests of personalityformation theory
76
national character
79
The Family as an Industry
84
sexual and social career
86
the abdication of parental authority
89
Groups
96
intensity and exclusiveness
101
sociology defined
102
institutions
104
kinds of families
105
The Basic Tension of Group Membership
110
gambling as an attempt to prove individual superiority
112
socialization of superiority feelings
114
the images groups form of each other
119
how useful are contacts?
123
the group feeling toward nonmembers
125
the basic tension of group membership
127
groups and personal relations
128
Rivalry Competition and Conflict
131
indirect competition
132
direct competition
134
conflict
137
oversocialization
139
cooperation
141
democracy
142
Leadership Authority and Power
146
authority and leadership
149
acquisition and scope of authority
150
authority and power
157
some causes and effects of authority and power
158
Culture Passion and Affectations
163
its influence on individuals
164
how we become aware of cultural patterns
169
can we assess cultures?
170
the ethos of culture and the human predicament
172
from john milton to sigmund freud
174
ethos and personal integration
178
affectations and passions
179
ethos and personal character
180
The Conflict between chapter Economic Progress and Social WellBeing
183
anomy and personality disintegration
186
notsopure vertical mobility
215
measurement
218
causes of mobility
220
stagnation and the caste system
224
a qualification illustrated by the Roman Catholic Church
226
expansion and the class system
227
war
228
revolution
229
vertical mobility in Europe and America
230
the outlook
232
Democracy and Elties
234
status groups
238
the segmental nature of status
240
divergent definitions of status
244
elites
246
elites in a democracy
249
agglutinization and transformation of status
251
democratizedor commercialized?transformation
254
Roles and the Prestige of Histrionics
255
the need for roles
258
tragedy and role conflict
261
the prestige of histrionics
264
role confusion and inconsistency
266
Snobbery and the Supreme Courts Prescription
269
that last infirmity of noble mind
270
group snobbery prejudice and discrimination
276
the Supreme Court and group snobbery
280
prejudice about prejudice
284
Why Is the Crowd Lonely?
290
the industrial setting
291
the economics of taste
296
the formation of mass taste
299
advertising
300
deindividualization
302
the exclusion of art
305
the power of consumers
310
the corruption of newly produced high culture
313
the role of universities and foundations
317
the adulteration of past culture
319
doityourself culture
320
the popularity of classics
322
Of Happiness and of Despair We Have No Measure
325
children and violence
327
the outlook
328
repression and discontent
329
boredom and diversion
332
who is slain when time is killed?
333
of happiness and of despair
335
Man as an Object of Science
340
objectivity
341
models
343
methodological alternatives
344
value judgments
346
happiness no help
348
limits of science
350
if not science what?
351
Bibliography
354
Index
360
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