The UNIX Philosophy

Front Cover
Elsevier, 1995 - Computers - 151 pages
3 Reviews
* Deals with powerful concepts in a simple way * Highlights important characteristics of Operating systems and other abstract entities in a new way * Explores the tenets of the UNIX operating system philosophy


Unlike so many books that focus on how to use UNIX, The UNIX Philosophy concentrates on answering the questions: `Why use UNIX in the first place?'. Readers will discover the rationale and reasons for such concepts as file system organization, user
interface and other system characteristics. In an informative, non-technical fashion, The UNIX Philosophy explores the general principles for applying the UNIX philosophy to software development. This book describes complex software design principles
and addresses the importance of small programs, code and data portability, early prototyping, and open user interfaces. The UNIX Philosophy is a book to be read before tackling the highly technical texts on UNIX internals and programming. Written for
both the computer layperson and the experienced programmer, this book explores the tenets of the UNIX operating system in detail, dealing with powerful concepts in a comprehensive, straightforward manner.
  

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Review: The Unix Philosophy

User Review  - Vahid - Goodreads

I'm extremely surprised that why nobody talks about this giant book on UNIX hackers community. I do believe that this book deserves to be added into major UNIX Holy-Texts. It teaches you the true spirit of designing software, in a UNIX style... Full of Wisdom Read full review

Review: The Unix Philosophy

User Review  - Aaron - Goodreads

A short read, but - like The Mythical Man Month - seminal for anyone creating software. The core lessons are surprisingly relevant and applicable immediately. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The UNIX Philosophy A Cast of Thousands
1
The UNIX Philosophy in a Nutshell
4
One Small Step for Humankind
9
Small is Beautiful
10
Software Engineering Made Easy
12
Make Each Program Do One Thing Well
19
Rapid Prototyping for Fun and Profit
23
Build a Prototype as Soon as Possible
27
Avoid Captive User Interfaces
88
Make Every Program a Filter
97
Using Programs as Filters
99
More UNIX Philosophy Ten Lesser Tenets
103
1 Allow the User to Tailor the Environment
104
2 Make Operating System Kernels Small and Lightweight
106
3 Use Lower Case and Keep It Short
107
4 Save Trees
109

The Three Systems of Man
29
The First System of Man
30
The Second System of Man
34
The Third System of Man
37
Building the Third System
40
The Portability Priority
45
Choose Portability over Efficiency
47
The Atari 2600
53
Store Numerical Data in Flat ASCII Files
56
One UNIX Philosophers Bag of Tricks
61
Now THATS Leverage
65
Use Software Leverage to Your Advantage
67
Use Shell Scripts to Increase Leverage and Portability
76
The Perils of Interactive Programs
85
5 Silence is Golden
111
6 Think Parallel
113
7 The Sum of the Parts is Greater Than the Whole
115
8 Look for the 90 Percent Solution
117
9 Worse is Better
119
10 Think Hierarchically
121
Making UNIX Do One Thing Well
125
Putting It All Together
130
UNIX and Other Operating System Philosophies
135
Human Engineering as Art
136
Over 70 Million Users Cant Be Wrong
138
The Antithesis of UNIX?
141
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Mike Gancarz is an applications and programming consultant in Atlanta, Georgia. Using Linux, Unix, and Java tools, his team develops award-winning imaging solutions for the financial services industry. An expert in Unix application design, Mike has been an advocate of the Unix approach for more than twenty years. As a member of the team that gave birth to the X Window System, he pioneered usability concepts still found in modern window managers running on Linux today. While working at Digital Equipment Corporation's Unix Engineering Group in Nashua, New Hampshire, Mike led the port of the Unix commands and utilities to the 64-bit Alpha processor. His first book, The Unix Philosophy (Digital Press, 1995), has sold over 15,000 copies worldwide.

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