Religion and Its Monsters

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2002 - Religion - 235 pages
4 Reviews
Religion's great and powerful mystery fascinates us, but it also terrifies. So too the monsters that haunt the stories of the Judeo-Christian mythos and earlier traditions: Leviathan, Behemoth, dragons, and other beasts. In this unusual and provocative book, Timothy K. Beal writes about the monsters that lurk in our religious texts, and about how monsters and religion are deeply entwined. Horror and faith are inextricable. Ans as monsters are part of religious texts and traditions, so religion lurks in the modern horror genre, from its birth in Dante's Inferno to the contemporary spookiness of H.P. Lovecraft and the Hellraiser films. Religion and Its Monsters is essential reading for students of religion and popular culture, as well as any readers with an interest in horror.
  

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Review: Religion and Its Monsters

User Review  - Stealth.librarian - Goodreads

Overall, I had to like it at a base level bc it was so readable. Tim Beal seems to be a very good academic writer (yay!) and that really comes out. In addition, the book was just interesting. However ... Read full review

Review: Religion and Its Monsters

User Review  - Tricia - Goodreads

Respectful but insightful analysis of Abrahamic traditions, monsters, and horror tropes. Best textbook I've ever been assigned. Ludicrously readable. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
2
Section 3
13
Section 4
23
Section 5
35
Section 6
47
Section 7
57
Section 8
71
Section 12
89
Section 13
103
Section 14
123
Section 15
141
Section 16
159
Section 17
173
Section 18
174
Section 19
193

Section 9
75
Section 10
84
Section 11
85
Section 20
197
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Timothy K. Beal holds the Harkness Chair of Biblical Literature at Case Western Reserve University. He is author of The Book of Hiding and co-editor of Reading Bibles, Writing Bodies, both published by Routledge.

Bibliographic information