Freedmen, the Fourteenth Amendment, and the Right to Bear Arms, 1866-1876 (Google eBook)

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 1998 - History - 230 pages
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Whether newly-freed slaves could be trusted to own firearms was in great dispute in 1866, and the ramifications of this issue reverberate in today's gun-control debate. This is the only comprehensive study ever published on the intent of the framers of the Fourteenth Amendment and of Reconstruction-era civil rights legislation to protect the right to keep and bear arms. Indeed, this is the most detailed study ever published about the intent of the Fourteenth Amendment to incorporate and to protect from state violation any of the rights guaranteed by the Bill of Rights, even including free speech. Paradoxically, the Second Amendment is virtually the only Bill of Rights guarantee not recognized by the federal courts as protected by the Fourteenth Amendment.

Through legislative and historical records generated during the Reconstruction epoch (1866-1876), Halbrook shows the intent of the Fourteenth Amendment and of civil rights legislation to guarantee full and equal rights to blacks, including the right to keep and bear arms.

  

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Contents

The Civil Rights and Freedmens Bureau Acts and the Proposal of the Fourteenth Amendment
1
Congress Reacts to Southern Rejection of the Fourteenth Amendment
57
The Southern State Constitutional Conventions
87
The Freedmens Bureau Act Reenacted and the Fourteenth Amendment Ratified
107
Toward Adoption of the Civil Rights Act of 1871
119
From the Klan Trials and Hearings through the End of the Civil Rights Revolution
135
The Cruikshank Case from Trial to the Supreme Court
159
Unfinished Jurisprudence
183
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

STEPHEN P. HALBROOK practices law in Fairfax, Virginia.

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