Adapting to Abundance: Jewish Immigrants, Mass Consumption, and the Search for American Identity

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, 1992 - History - 276 pages
1 Review

Between 1880 and 1914, Eastern European Jewish immigrants in New York's Lower East Side defined themselves as American not only by their occupations or education but by their spending practices as well. Jewish immigrants assimilated into American culture through the purchase of fashions, material goods, and resort vacations, combined with Jewish social and religious traditions to create a unique and innovative American identity.

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Adapting to Abundance: Jewish Immigrants, Mass Consumption, and the Search for American Identity (Columbia History of Urban Life)

User Review  - Z. Taylor - Goodreads

I liked this book so much. At the time when Heinze wrote it, the idea of evaluating immigrants according to their consumption patterns was revolutionary. He started a whole new trend. If you like ... Read full review

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1992)

Edward D. berkowitz is professor of history and public policy and public administration at George Washington University. He is the author of eight books and the editor of three collections. During the seventies he served as a staff member of the President's Commission for a National Agenda, helping President Carter plan for a second term that never came to be.

Bibliographic information