Tomorrow in the Battle Think on Me

Front Cover
New Directions Publishing, 1997 - Fiction - 313 pages
16 Reviews

"No one ever suspects," begins Tomorrow in the Battle Think On Me, "that they might one day find themselves with a dead woman in their arms.... Marta has just met Victor when she invites him to dinner at her Madrid apartment while her husband is away on business. When her two-year-old son finally falls asleep, Marta and Victor retreat to the bedroom. Undressing, she feels suddenly ill; and in his arms, inexplicably, she dies.

What should Victor do? Remove the compromising tape from the phone machine? Leave food for the child, for breakfast? These are just his first steps, but he soon takes matters further; unable to bear the shadows and the unknowing, Victor plunges into dark waters. And Javier Marķas, Europe's master of secrets, of what lies reveal and truth may conceal, is on sure ground in this profound, quirky, and marvelous novel. "Brilliantly imagined and hugely intricate," as La Vanguardia noted, "it is a novel one reads with enormous pleasure."

  

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Review: Tomorrow in the Battle Think on Me

User Review  - Robert Wechsler - Goodreads

4.5. What struck me most in the first hundred pages is how the narrator stands aloof from what occurs and the people involved, describing and speculating with little knowledge. This is both very ... Read full review

Review: Tomorrow in the Battle Think on Me

User Review  - Renata Limon - Goodreads

Not as good as his others. A Heart So White probably the best. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
25
Section 3
59
Section 4
89
Section 5
107
Section 6
134
Section 7
166
Section 8
193
Section 9
224
Section 10
253
Section 11
271
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Javier Marķas is an award-winning Spanish novelist. He is also a translator and columnist, as well as the current king of Redonda. He was born in Madrid in 1951 and published his first novel at the age of nineteen. He has held academic posts in Spain, the US (he was a visiting professor at Wellesley College) and Britain, as a lecturer in Spanish Literature at Oxford University. He has been translated into 34 languages, and more than six million copies of his books have been sold worldwide. In 1997 he won the Nelly Sachs Award; the Comunidad de Madrid award in 1998; in 2000 the Grinzane Cavour Award, the Alberto Moravia Prize, and the Dublin IMPAC Award. He also won the Spanish National Translation Award in 1979 for his translation of Tristram Shandy in 1979. He was a professor at Oxford University and the Complutense of Madrid. He currently lives in Madrid.

Margaret Jull Costa has translated into the English more than 35 books, including Nobel Laureate Jose Saramago's "All the Names" & "The Tale of the Unknown Island", Antonio Perez Reverte's "The Flander's Panel", Fernando Pessoa's Book of Disquiet" & Luisa Valenzuela's "Bedside Manners". She lives in London.

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