Life of Washington: a biography, personal, military, and political, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Virtue and company, 1860
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Page 204 - That it be recommended to the respective assemblies and conventions of the United Colonies where no government sufficient to the exigencies of their affairs, has been hitherto established, to adopt such government as shall in the opinion of the representatives of the people, best conduce to the happiness and safety of their constituents in particular, and America In general.
Page 538 - If I were an American, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms never never never.
Page 213 - NEW JERSEY Richard Stockton John Witherspoon Francis Hopkinson John Hart Abraham Clark PENNSYLVANIA Robert Morris Benjamin Rush Benjamin...
Page 180 - THE time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves ; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their houses and farms are to be pillaged and destroyed, and themselves consigned to a state of wretchedness, from which no human efforts will deliver them. The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this army.
Page 58 - ... on the scales, For in their hopes Columbia's arm prevails. Anon Britannia droops the pensive head, While round increase the rising hills of dead. Ah! cruel blindness to Columbia's state! Lament thy thirst of boundless power too late. Proceed, great chief, with virtue on thy side, Thy ev'ry action let the goddess guide. A crown, a mansion, and a throne that shine, With gold unfading, Washington! be thine.
Page 205 - Britain, and it is necessary that the exercise of every kind of authority under the said Crown should be totally suppressed, and all the powers of government exerted under the authority of the people of the Colonies...
Page 51 - I know the unhappy predicament in which I stand ; I know that much is expected of me; I know, that, without men, without arms, without ammunition, without any thing fit for the accommodation of a soldier, little is to be done ; and, what is mortifying, I know that I cannot stand justified to the world without exposing my own weakness, and injuring the cause, by declaring my wants, which I am determined not to do, farther than unavoidable necessity brings every man acquainted with them.
Page 625 - I must in justice to myself, when this campaign is closed, which I believe will close the war, retire from a service at the head of which is placed a man capable of offering such injuries.
Page 538 - You may swell every expense and every effort still more extravagantly ; pile and accumulate every assistance you can buy or borrow ; traffic and barter with every little pitiful German prince that sells and sends his subjects to the shambles...
Page 302 - It becomes evidently clear then, that as this Contest is not likely to be the Work of a day; as the War must be carried on systematically, and to do it, you must have good Officers, there are, in my Judgment, no other possible means to obtain them but by establishing your Army upon a permanent footing...

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