The Underground Railroad in Floyd County, Indiana (Google eBook)

Front Cover
McFarland, Jul 11, 2001 - Social Science - 224 pages
0 Reviews
Floyd County, Indiana, and its county seat, New Albany, are located directly across the Ohio River from Louisville, Kentucky. Louisville was a major slave-trade center, and Indiana was a free state. Many slaves fled to Floyd County via the Underground Railroad, but their fight for freedom did not end once they reached Indiana. Sufficient information on slaves coming to and through this important area may be found in court records, newspaper stories, oral history accounts, and other materials that a full and fascinating history is possible, one detailing the struggles that runaway slaves faced in Floyd County, such as local, state, and federal laws working together to keep them from advancing socially, politically, and economically. This work also discusses the attitudes, people, and places that help in explaining the successes and heartaches of escaping slaves in Floyd County. Included are a number of freedom and manumission papers, which provided court certification of the freedom of former slaves.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Conditions During the Antebellum Period
3
The AntiBlack Bias
15
AntiSlavery Sentiment Political and Social
26
AntiSlavery Sentiment Religious
38
The Free African American Community
59
Underground Railroad Escape Routes
84
Specific Underground Railroad Sites
99
Key Individuals
120
Transfers to Second Presbyterian Church 18371852
141
Sneed AntiSlavery Memorial 1840
143
Floyd County African American Heads of Households 1830
147
Floyd County African Americans in the Civil War
149
Freedom Papers Bills of Sale Deeds of Manumission
151
Notes
171
Bibliography
203
Index
211

Final Comments
131
Epilogue
134

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 11 - I will in like manner abide by and faithfully support all proclamations of the President made during the existing rebellion having reference to slaves, so long and so far as not modified or declared void by decision of the Supreme Court. So help me God.
Page 8 - ... shall be imprisoned in the penitentiary for not less than one or more than five years, and be disfranchised for any determined period.

References to this book

About the author (2001)

Pamela R. Peters is a former legal secretary. She lives in New Albany, Indiana.

Bibliographic information