The Religious Crisis of the 1960s

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OUP Oxford, Nov 22, 2007 - Religion - 302 pages
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The 1960s were a time of explosive religious change. In the Christian churches it was a time of innovation, from the 'new theology' and 'new morality' of Bishop Robinson to the evangelicalism of the Charismatic Movement, and of charismatic leaders, such as Pope John XXIII and Martin Luther King. But it was also a time of rapid social and cultural change when Christianity faced challenges from Eastern religions, from Marxism and feminism, and above all from new 'affluent' lifestyles.Hugh McLeod tells in detail, using oral history, how these movements and conflicts were experienced in England, but because the Sixties were an international phenomenon he also looks at other countries, especially the USA and France. McLeod explains what happened to religion in the 1960s, why ithappened, and how the events of that decade shaped the rest of the 20th century.

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About the author (2007)


Hugh McLeod is Professor of Church History at the University of Birmingham.

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