Three Trapped Tigers

Front Cover
Dalkey Archive Press, 2004 - Fiction - 487 pages
32 Reviews

Cabrera Infante's masterpiece, Three Trapped Tigers is one of the most playful books to reach the U.S. from Cuba. Filled with puns, wordplay, lists upon lists, and Sternean typography -- such as the section entitled "Some Revelations," which consists of several blank pages -- this novel has been praised as a more modern, sexier, funnier, Cuban Ulysses. Centering on the recollections of a man separated from both his country and his youth, Cabrera Infante creates an enchanting vision of life and the many colorful characters found in steamy Havana's pre-Castro cabaret society.

  

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Review: Three Trapped Tigers

User Review  - Ellen - Goodreads

Guillermo Carbrera Infante was born in 1929 in Gibara, a small town in Cuba. His father was one of the founders of the Cuban Communist Party. Through poverty the author could not realize his dreams of ... Read full review

Review: Three Trapped Tigers

User Review  - Christian - Goodreads

Hmm, that was a bit weird. Approached in the right frame of mind - as in, prepared to go along for the ride rather than expecting such fripperies as..erm..a plot - this was ok for a while. Some of the ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
11
Section 3
16
Section 4
24
Section 5
27
Section 6
34
Section 7
40
Section 8
47
Section 18
132
Section 19
135
Section 20
158
Section 21
161
Section 22
209
Section 23
213
Section 24
237
Section 25
240

Section 9
55
Section 10
67
Section 11
71
Section 12
76
Section 13
85
Section 14
90
Section 15
118
Section 16
125
Section 17
126
Section 26
242
Section 27
291
Section 28
292
Section 29
300
Section 30
302
Section 31
311
Section 32
317
Section 33
482
Copyright

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References to this book

Cuba
Andrew Coe,Rolando Pujol
Snippet view - 1997
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About the author (2004)

Born in Cuba, Guillermo Cabrera Infante (1929--2005) was a supporter of the revolution and a cultural attaché under Castro's regime until his journal was censored and shut down by the new government. In 1965 he went into exile and became one of the earliest and most outspoken of Castro's Cuban critics. He produced both fiction and nonfiction, including the novel Infante's Inferno and the "history" Holy Smoke. He was also the screenwriter of such acclaimed and notorious films as Vanishing Point and Wonderwall.

Bibliographic information